Discussion Topic

cartoon2.jpg

I wanted to thank Brendan and Dennis again for their hard work in putting together the Achillesblog Rehab Tracker and the Achillesblog Summary Table. Links to those two items can be found on the left sidebar.

When I read through the data the number of left foot vs. right foot ruptures listed in the Rehab Tracker caught my eye. Of those reporting, 70% of the ruptures occurred in the left foot. This got me thinking a little bit. I believe one of the many journal articles I’ve read over the last couple of months made mention of ruptures occurring more frequently in the non-dominate foot. This was true in my case. I ruptured my right AT, and I am left footed.

So, I thought I’d throw out the topic for discussion. Did your rupture occur in your dominate or non-dominate foot? In case you’re wondering, your dominate foot is the one you naturally kick with. I’ve changed the poll on the left sidebar so you can enter your response there. Or, feel free to leave a comment indicating whether you injured your dominate or non-dominate foot.

7 Responses to “Discussion Topic”

  1. Tom -
    That’s an interesting observation. I think my case is an exception.
    My dominant foot is my left, (I kick with it) and it’s the one that I ruptured. For layups, I like to jump off of my right. (I am left handed.) Also, I ATR’ed while back-pedaling, like Brendan.
    You probably see less of that in skiers, since I think people who rupture while skiing usually are going forward. :) voting now..

  2. Great cartoon! :P

  3. I ruptured my fight AT. I am left handed and over the past 12-18 months developed Achilles tendinosis on the right side because of tennis. Forehands, especially in older players who turn and step into the ball, are always hit off the foot opposite your racquet hand. The same rule generally applies in basketball - you go up for a jump shot or lay up off the foot opposite your shooting hand. As a result, the majority of right handed tennis player and basketball player rupture their left Achilles. In my case, my weakened right AT could not take the stress of a forward fall while skiing. As my doctor accurately observed, had my top boot buckle been tighter, as it would have been later in the ski day (it was still early morning and I hadn’t fully tightened my boots) I probably would have been ok and the boot would have released from the binding. My AT released instead. My only consolation is that if it hadn’t happened then, it almost certainly happened during playing tennis.

  4. I ruptured my right AT. I am left handed and over the past 12-18 months developed Achilles tendinosis on the right side because of tennis. Forehands, especially in older players who turn and step into the ball, are always hit off the foot opposite your racquet hand. The same rule generally applies in basketball - you go up for a jump shot or lay up off the foot opposite your shooting hand. As a result, the majority of right handed tennis player and basketball player rupture their left Achilles. In my case, my weakened right AT could not take the stress of a forward fall while skiing. As my doctor accurately observed, had my top boot buckle been tighter, as it would have been later in the ski day (it was still early morning and I hadn’t fully tightened my boots) I probably would have been ok and the boot would have released from the binding. My AT released instead. My only consolation is that if it hadn’t happened then, it almost certainly happened during playing tennis.

  5. Yes, I noticed that also. I ruptured my non-dominant AT. Interesting. I usually push off when I start to run with my right foot. When I broke myself, I did kind of a 180 in the air to change direction and planted with my left foot. POW!!!

  6. I guess I always assumed my dominant foot was the one I jumped off of…but apparently that is not the case? So I ruptured the one that I jump off of (L), but I do kick a soccer ball with my right foot.

  7. i ruptured my left At while running during a soccer game. My right side, though is the dominant one. I had heard a POP sound two weeks prior to my injury and got it checked by my physio and he thought is was only swelled up. I was quite tender .

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.