So many injuries, so many treatments

Hi there,

“Allow myself to introduce… myself.” - Austin Powers.  Actually, my name’s Mike - and I’ve found lots of interesting things off of this site.  While it’s highly debatable whether I’ll provide any useful information back to the community at large, I figured I’d give it a shot…  Plus, I like being able to follow my progress along the marathon tracker.

The event:

The injury itself seems to be “classic textbook”… I was playing <insert sport here> volleyball and as I was turning [ed: I wish I could say I was jumping or something heroic], it felt like someone collided into me and stepped directly on my calf… I went down like a tonne of bricks and sat up with a bit of numbness + tingling in my left leg.  I was quite certain that someone had run into - and was looking angrily around.  To my surprise and dismay, I was informed that I had managed to do it all on my own and nobody side-swiped me.  At that point I grew a bit concerned.

For me the pain was surprisingly low… there was just tingling sensations and I knew I couldn’t quite control my left leg as well as my right leg… I figured I had just cramped up or sprained something so I elevated the leg and someone kindly brought me some ice.

After about a half-hour of letting adrenaline wear off, I started walking on it… slight pain when applying pressure but nothing ridiculous… Still having seen a fellow player tear his achilles a few years prior on probably an equally innocent looking playing, I was concerned and went to Emergency at a nearby hospital.

The Diagnosis:

I got to the hospital around 11pm, and eventually got to see a doctor around 4am… I was very lucky to have my sister wait with me and help me around.  Doctor asked what happened, he did the Thompson test which came back positive [? -well confirming I had ruptured it anyways] and said “You may or may not want to have surgery. An orthopedic surgeon will discuss with you the pros and cons of each tomorrow”…   My injury was apparently so textbook, that he went to get one of the nurses to show her how the Thompson test worked…

Well, later that morning around 8am, I was going to have an ultrasound but the Orthopedic surgeon performed the Thompson test for himself, and declared that there was no reason for ultrasound - “they’ll probably just indicate it’s a partial tear - inconclusive”.

I was explained my options of either non-surgical and a surgery repair. I was told the surgical repair would require less time in a cast, require smaller casts, less risk of re-rupture and pretty much be certain that I would be repaired.  It had the risk of infection or complication due to surgery.

Given my age and level of activity that I wished to continue - I pretty much was all set for surgery.  What I didn’t expect was that he would be able to perform the surgery that afternoon.

To be continued…

mike

3 Comments so far

  1. Madison on November 3rd, 2009

    I have broken my ankle and the doctor has given me the choice of a regular foot cast or an air cast. I have never had a cast , although I have broken my ankle once before, so I do not know what it feels like. Can you give me some pros and cons to each to help me make my decision?

  2. Madison on November 3rd, 2009

    I have broken my ankle and the doctor has given me the choice of a regular foot cast or an air cast. I have never had a cast , although I have broken my ankle once before, so I do not know what it feels like. Can you give me some pros and cons for each to help me make my decision? Which one did you prefer?

  3. tenthrow on November 3rd, 2009

    Hey Madison,

    Sorry to hear about your injury. I’ve never had a *normal* cast but here’s what I’ve noticed between my first “semi-rigid” and the aircast. Bear in mind - I am NO doctor.

    I’m a huge fan of the air cast because:
    1- you can take it off and shower the normally covered area
    2- can give yourself opportunity to breathe your leg - I can’t believe how much my leg itched after a few days in the more normal cast and I had to will myself to try and forget it.

    The cons I would see with the aircast:
    - I took mine off at night to sleep, technically, I wasn’t supposed for fear of losing the support. If you are prone to “not following” doctor’s orders and you’re supposed to stay in your cast 24/7 then the air cast might be too tempting for you.
    - they might cost more - I’m in Canada, and had to pay for it, the first cast was covered… but my work insurance covered it.
    - I flew with my aircast, and one of the customs agent’s made me take it off. Mind you I was without crutches, so looked “pretty able” - on the other hand, I was able to also not wear it on the plane which was great for comfort.

    Overall, aircast for the win. :) Just make sure to get clear instructions from your doctor what you are allowed to do with it.

    best wishes in your recovery.

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