tanja90’s AchillesBlog

Just another AchillesBlog.com weblog

Helpful supplements for tissue repair

Filed under: Uncategorized — tanja90 at 7:22 pm on Tuesday, August 5, 2014

I have been taking the following supplements and feel that they have helped me progress relatively quickly; I was in 2 shoes five days after having my cast removed, six weeks post surgery. Just under two weeks post cast removal I am using leg resistance machines in the gym. Read about my progress so far here http://achillesblog.com/tanja90/2014/08/03/my-timeline-so-far/

BCAAs

BCAAs (Branched Chain Amino Acids) are made up of three essential amino, leucine, isoleucine, and valine. They are essential because the body is unable to make them out of other amino acids, meaning they must be ingested through food or supplements. The BCAAs make up 40 percent of the daily requirement of all nine essential amino acids, indicating their importance.

The BCAAs are found in foods containing protein, with the highest concentrations in chicken, beef, salmon, eggs, and whey protein. They can also be supplemented, which can be useful for athletes because free form BCAAs bypass the liver and gut tissue and go directly to the blood stream.

As their name suggests, BCAAs have a branched side chain that simplifies the job of converting each amino acid into energy during intense exertion. They make up about 35 percent of all muscle tissue. The more BCAAs that are present in the muscles, the more they will be used for energy, slowing the breakdown of muscles cells and preventing muscle loss.

BCAAs are well known for triggering protein synthesis. Combining BCAAs with resistance exercise results in maximal protein synthesis because they both trigger something called the mTORC1 signaling pathway that is essential for muscle building.

The BCAAs along with alanine, aspartate, and glutamate are all taken into muscle tissue for energy. It is suggested that muscle is designed to burn BCAAs for energy during exercise, making a large pool essential for performance.

Another great benefit of BCAAs is that if you have to take time off from training due to injury, a need for a break, or lack of time, increasing your BCAA intake will minimize muscle loss. In addition, because BCAAs trigger protein synthesis even in the absence of exercise, the preservation of lean muscle tissue can keep metabolism up and help prevent fat gain when inactive.

For example, in a rodent study, giving BCAAs to rats that had their hind-limbs immobilized for six days helped preserve protein synthesis. The BCAAs didn’t completely prevent muscle atrophy in the rats’ hind limbs, but they helped preserve the muscle to a greater extent than a placebo. The BCAA-fed rats also had lower body fat levels following immobilization.
http://www.poliquingroup.com/articlesmultimedia/articles/article/1088/ten_benefits_of_bcaas.aspx

MSM

MSM (Methylsulfonylmethane) is a naturally occurring nutrient that provides the body with essential sulfur and methyl groups that are used in healing and repair processes. MSM is prized by professional and amateur athletes for effective nutritional support of athletic performance and recovery from soft tissue and joint injuries. MSM can safely be taken over the long term with no documented toxicity. As a result, athletes can achieve improved performance, pain relief, and enhanced tissue repair without fear of side effects.

MSM is thought to deliver sulfur to the body in a useable way. Sulfur helps maintain the structure of connective tissue by forming cross-linkages through disulfide bonds, i.e., sulfur strengthens the tissues that make up the joint.

Sulfur is critical to good joint health. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are the fundamental building blocks of joint cartilage, and GAG molecules are linked together in chains by disulfide bonds. As the name implies, these bonds are between two sulfur atoms. The disulfide bridges reduce conformational flexibility of GAG chains, making cartilage firm and resilient. Cartilage integrity is thus a sulfur-dependent state.

MSM contains a lot of sulfur – 34% by weight. While more research is needed to determine how the body absorbs the sulfur it needs from MSM, preliminary studies in mice and in horses suggest that the sulfur in MSM is incorporated into proteins and into joint tissues.
http://www.msmguide.com/jointpain/sportsjointpain/
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2 Comments »

4

Comment by mags11

August 5, 2014 @ 11:02 pm

This is a good read. In addition to bcaa (which is in my muscle milk in addition to other amino acids), I’ve been taking vitamin c and jello (for gelatin).

I haven’t heard about msm but ill have to look into it.

Be interesting to see if this all leads to a speedier recovery!

6

Comment by annababi

August 7, 2014 @ 11:59 pm

this was very interesting reading. I do look for supplements and natural ways to help with the healing and will look more into these two you report above. I did start with some gelatin as well, though not through jello as I just don’t like the taste of that. :)

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