Four weeks to the day after surgery and I’m now in a boot - DeRoyal Pacesetter Air Walker. Getting the cast off yesterday was a thrill. Seeing my ‘peanut’ for a calf, however, was a reality check. Thanks to reading other posts on Achillesblog.com I knew not to expect much (thanks alfia). I will use the crutches for at least the next couple of weeks while I get more comfortable with the boot, put more weight on the Achilles, and start PT.

For those about to get the cast off, be warned…you may feel ‘pin pricks’ on your heel as you start walking around, even when you’re not putting much weight on your foot. I was told this is normal as the foot starts to figure out how to be useful again. Anyone else have comments on these ‘pin pricks’?

Something to noodle on as well… I decided to sleep last night without the boot on. Probably not the best idea I’ve had, I woke up at least 5 times worried about the Achilles. Tonight, the boot stays on, and hopefully I’ll sleep.

Next goal, get in the pool!


Comments

6 Comments so far

  1. sfcat on January 21, 2009 12:27 pm

    Pin pricks and pulling…yup. I got them too…and still do. I recommend getting something like Icy/Hot patches (as long as you’re not allergic to menthol or the other stuff they have in it), and wrapping one around your heel and where ever else your calf/leg is sore. It helps relieve some of the pain at night. I didn’t use them my first time around and am grateful for them this time around…I’m taking much less pain meds now than I was in ‘07.

    As for sleeping with the boot…do it. You’ll be glad you did because it keeps your tendon stretched while you sleep, you won’t wake up to a sharp pain because your foot flexed and tugged on your tendon (although this happens to me even when I have the boot on…it’s much much much less severe on the pain meter), and you don’t have to worry about bedding getting twisted up around foot…and then a tug on bedding unknowingly…eek! That has happenned to me, although I was awake and it was a slight tug and therefore didn’t cause reinjury, but yeah, wouldn’t want you to experience that if you/I can help it.

    Oh…btw- don’t know if you care, but I’m researching night splints as an alternative to my boot while sleeping. Because the boot is rather bulky and heavy…I purchased a Futuro brand splint online and am waiting for it to arrive. I’ll post my review on my site at http://www.achillesblog.com/sfcat.

  2. georgie on May 8, 2009 6:26 pm

    While you are on the subject of pain I would love to know if my experience is common. I had terrible pain when having my boot (with 30cm heel wedge) fitted after six weeks in plaster. Now two days later I have some pain, still have a swollen foot and have a small dark bruise just above my heel. I am worried the achilles might have re-ruptured. The Orthotist who fitted the boot said it was not possible. As far as sleeping goes I am without boot on doctor’s advice and it is great.

  3. patty on January 28, 2010 2:57 pm

    i am in a air boot cast and it is horrible my foot burns and swells all the time the boot is on , i tryed sleeping with the boot 4 nights and got very little sleep . I have gone to the air splint . i wonder if i am allergic to the boot ??

  4. normofthenorth on January 31, 2010 12:40 pm

    I’ve gone the non-surgical route this time (2nd ATR, 8 yrs ago I had the surgery). I’ve been in an Aircast boot for most of the last 7 weeks, though I just switched to a hinged boot that I still had from 8 years ago(!). I’ve got it locked in neutral position with no heel lifts (which just got removed about a week ago — see my blog if you care!).

    My skin didn’t suffer badly, but it didn’t love being plastered against the foam of the Aircast boot. Being able to shower barefoot helps, partly because it lets the boot air out a bit, and you can also clean it up some. (I started that at around 4 wks — but remember that I had no incision to worry about.)

    The other thing that’s cheered up the skin on my leg is when I started wearing a long sock on my bad foot/leg. Obviously, putting a tight sock onto a foot with a recently torn AT is a delicate operation, but if you dare, and you’re careful — not to EITHER dorsiflex the foot OR to use your AT to hold your toe down while you pull it up hard with the sock — it is much more comfortable and “normal” to have a sock between you and the boot, than not.

    Yes, I think most of us experienced “pins and needles” when we first put weight on our bad foot after weeks of NWB. I compared it to little electrical shocks. I think it’s a good “speed limit”, i.e., make your WBAT (Weight Bearing As Tolerated) stop short of that point.

    I also experienced some discomfort right under my heel, as I progressed to FWB and also afterwards. After I walk around a lot in the boot, my heel is sometimes uncomfortable or mildly pained even now, and I’m scheduled to come out of the boot soon, at 8 weeks in.

    My current sock is a thick ski sock, which also adds a bit of (helpful) padding under my foot.

    I’m still sleeping in the boot, ’cause both of my health pro’s say I should — I’m following the protocol from the Univ. W. Ontario study that recently found that non-surgery works just as well as surgery, and that’s what they did, so that’s what I’m doing. The worst part is the contact between the boot and my GOOD foot while I sleep — mostly on my side, either way.

  5. Runner on July 18, 2010 9:46 pm

    I fractured my fibula two weeks ago and and wearing an aircast boot. It was swollen for several days and even now when I don’t wear my boot at night. I saw two doctors and one ortho. The first doctor said I don’t need the boot when I am sleeping. The second doctor said I do need the boot when I am sleeping.

  6. carol on November 27, 2012 3:47 pm

    do you sleep in surgical boot after hammer toe operation? I’m afraid the pins sticking out will get tangled in bed linen

Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Speak your mind

*
To prove you're a person (not a spam script), type the security word shown in the picture.
Anti-Spam Image

Powered by WP Hashcash