What to expect in recovery from Haglund’s deformity surgery

I’m a fitness instructor who had a partial rupture of the achilles (left) about 14 months ago. I was coaching two teams and then went to a training session for coaches. It didn’t hurt at the time but the next morning, I couldn’t even walk it was so incredibly painful. After 14 months of physical therapy, exercises, boot, ASTYM, cortisone shots, etc., it became obvious that although the partial rupture had to have healed, things were getting worse, not better.

I had surgery last Friday (Oct 2) to remove the Haglund’s deformity and am wondering what kind of recovery time can I expect? The surgeon put me in a boot and said “PWB as tolerated.” It’s been 7 days since surgery and I tried PWB yesterday and today I can say emphatically that is was not well tolerated the following day (today) as my pain level is up.

Anybody else had this surgery and farther along in the recovery process? I really don’t know what to expect and how hard to push it.  I’m slated to go back to teaching 14 days post surgery but it will only be a pilates class. At 30 days though, I’m supposed to return to teaching a weightlifting class. Is that even going to be doable?

151 Responses to “What to expect in recovery from Haglund’s deformity surgery”

  1. Your recovery time depends greatly on which procedure your surgeon performed. The classic ‘remove the tendon, scrape down the deformity, attach the tendon’ procedure has a recovery time very much like any other achilles injury, but the others are likely to heal much more quickly but perhaps be much more painful, especially the old ‘remove a slice from the calcaneous’ maneuver. Those procedures look decidedly uncomfortable.

  2. Had the surgery Oct. 2. The old detach the AT, cut about 1″ off cIalcaneal (had a nice sized bone spur), remove calcification from AT.

    Pain not really that bad, but there is no way that I could possibly be PWB.

    I have been consistent with elevation and inactivity, and it seems to have kept swelling and pain down.

    I agree, each case on its own merit, and your healing time, etc. will be different from most others. My Ortho told me 6 months, maybe longer….but I believe that I will be pretty much up and about in 4 months…I do not know how long it takes the AT to re-join/grow back into the heel, and what impact the screws holding it to the bone will have.

    I have resolved to do what I am told, when I am told….

    This was a much bigger deal than I realized…but I want to walk with no pain and no limp…

  3. I am wondering exactly what he did do. Before surgery the discharge sheet said NWB but after surgery is was crossed out and replaced with “PWB as tolerated.” I know what procedures he’d talked about and wrote down on the legal paper I had to sign

    1. remove the bone spur
    2. remove retrocalcaneal bursa
    3. debride tendon
    4. attach/reattach as needed
    5. augment with tendon that goes to big toe if there’s not enough achilles tendon left after debriding

    But since the discharge instructions changed, I really have no idea what he did for certain. I’m sure he did 1 and 2 and I know he did NOT do 5. It’s 3 and 4 I don’t know about.

    My pain level was excruciating once the nerve block wore off about 3 am that first night. For the next three days - the pain was the kind that wakes you up every half hour to every hour even while under the influence of two of those little white pills that I had my husband doling out (they make it so I can’t remember anything including when I took the last one so he got the task of dispensing the drugs).

    I am not even going to attempt PWB again until I see the surgeon for my post-op this coming Wednesday when I get my stitches out. It swells and the pain level goes back up to the little white pill level when I do. As long as I am NWB and keep the foot up, the swelling doesn’t get too bad and discomfort is dealt with by a couple motrin.

    Going into it, my PT said to be realistic and realize that it would be 12 months before I was really back to what I consider normal. However, being a type-a person and a fitness instructor, my normal is not necessarily “normal” for anyone else.

    I hear you on the I want to walk without pain. Me too. And bike and run and dance and play soccer with my kids and teach step and … just plain old get back to normal.

  4. Oh no, fitnessgennie, you’re scaring me! 12 months or longer to be back to normal, I don’t think I could do this. How do you manage weight and physical fitness by being so limited?

  5. I was told by my surgeon and PT that anytime something like the achilles is injured, it’s 12 months to FULL recovery. I expect to be able to start running by about 5-6 months. Probably not far but running as part of the physical therapy process.

    I’m a fitness instructor so I know how to modify for injuries. Not much stops me. You just have to make up your mind to do it. Upper body work can still be done - pushups, dips keeping the injured foot lifted suspended mid-air, shoulders, arms, upper and lower back, single leg squats, single leg lunges (requires a ball), pilates, crunches. There’s really a lot I can do right now. For the injured leg, I’ve been doing quad sets, and there are machines that you can use for the gluts in the gym that don’t involved the calf. I always thought those things were useless … until now.

    Once I get the okay from my PT, swimming or biking will be the first thing I’d like to add back to get the heart and lungs back into shape. I could swim using a pull buoy if I am only allowed a short about of time with both legs. That’s what I was doing prior to surgery as it was so painful to use my calf. I was already rather limited prior to surgery. Whichever he’ll let me do first, I’m going for it. And I’ve lvoe to get walking. My dog’s getting fat sitting around with me all the time.

    You’ll be fine. make a list of what you can do and figure out how you’re going to get to an fro, what kind of help you might need during workouts (like someone to carry plates and/or weights for you). Then make a plan and ask for help where you need it.

  6. I’m also a group exercise instructor and ruptured my achilles tendon snowboarding in March. I was able to stay in shape during the time I was in the boot by using the rowing machine with one leg and doing a lot of upper body, single leg and abs work. I went back to teaching full yoga classes about 8 weeks after surgery and started teaching spin about 9 weeks or so post-op. I was able to start running at 16 weeks. I would say that I was 95% recovered by the 6 month mark and I’m about 98% now at 8 months. My right calf is just slightly weaker than my left but it doesn’t have any impact on my activities. I can run, jump rope, do really tough mountain bike ride, etc., and plan to go back to snowboarding next month. I was told 12 months until full recovery, but I think if you work hard, while not overdoing it, you can cut that in half.

    Stacy

  7. Stacy,

    I am inspired by your recovery. I am 3 weeks post surgery and hope to be active again at 8 weeks. I tore my Achilles playing football but I also snowboard so I am wondering what you did while snowboarding to tear your achilles.

    Thanks,

    Chris

  8. Stacy,

    That is good news. I saw my surgeon today and he said IF I don’t overdo, I could very likely be back to normal by 6 months. That’s all well and good but I’m going to wait and see what the PT says as I’ve found his estimates to be pretty darn accurate. I want 6 months but I also don’t want to get my hopes up.

    I start PT Monday. I return to teaching my weightlifting class tonight. I am allowed to start swimming now as well without the pull buoy as long as it doesn’t hurt. And swell, of course. I am really, really looking forward to being able to take on my step classes again but I know that’ll be a while. Jeanie

  9. Oh I feel each and everyones pain here. I had the bone shaved off in March 2009 and then in September after the pain was getting worse I had to go back for another surgery on the same foot. This time the achilles was lengthened and more bone shaved off. I was NWB for 6 weeks in a half cast and then 6 weeks in a PWB boot. I can tell you that 5 months later I am still in pain. But its more of a calf muscle pain. I also have to have the other foot done, but I am going to wait till the right foot is 100% healed. I am sure this will be a 12 month recovery period

  10. I am at 4 weeks post surgery for removal of the Hagland’s deformity. I had it for quite a long time and after it got pretty painful I decided to have it removed. I have been in a cast, NWB the whole time. I have the cast removed in two days and hope to be able to be at least PWB by that time. These crutches are killing me, not to mention the inconvenience of having my wife drive me around. (right foot, of course).

  11. I am 16 days post surgery for Hagland’s deformity as well as having the damaged tissue from my Achilles removed and new tendon grafted on before it was reattached. I am a 60 year old choreographer and dance teacher and for the past 3 years every doctor just told me it was time to retire. That is until I found the ortho-surgeon who said he could fix things and get me dancing again. Frankly I was at the point where all I really wanted was to walk without a limp and to have less pain.

    I go next week to have the stitches removed and I am hoping to go from NWB to PWB. I hate the no driving and I HATE Crutches. It is great to read about others who have been where I am right now. I am so tired from the effort to get around and I look forward to that ending. I wonder if there are others my age who have gone through this who can talk to me about the recovery. I was swimming 5 days a week up until the surgery and although the pain was awful I was still working in the theater choreographing shows even right up until the last day. Now all I want is to get back to doing what I love and what pays the bills.

  12. Hey Bebe! Another theatre gypsy! Very cool! I’m 50 and former ABT ballerina now a teacher and choreographer. I very much related to your post!

    Ruptured my left Achilles Tendon on May 31st during a production I had choreographed of Romeo and Juliet. I was in the wings when a dancer flew into the wrong wing and I moved (deftly, I THOUGHT!) to avoid a collision. Heard a ghastly pop and thought the rubber heel on my split-soled jazz shoe had come off. But, of course, it was my AT. Had surgery on 6/7/11 and am full weight bearing in “the boot” . Hope to make the transfer to two-shoes at my next appointment with the surgeon! I would like to return to being able to demonstrate some things for class/choreography but do feel my days of demonstrating petit batterie and grand allegro are now completely done. I’m trying to be realistic about my niche as a middle-aged ballet choreographer!

    Anyway, I wish you all the very very best with your post-op recovery and return to dancing! Professional dancers are a tough breed — that should hold us in good stead!

  13. Hi Daisy,
    It is so helpful to know there are people who understand we are not “done” just because we are no longer performers. I hope you are in two shoes very soon. I have been hired to choreograph 4 show over the next 12 months so I am encouraged that local producers don’t find me too old, and they have all been willing to hire me rehearsal assistants while makes me feel my skills are still appreciated. I am also so lucky to have a surgeon who is treated me like an aging athlete instead of a horse in need of the pasture. All of these things and the tough dancer mentality are what I am counting on to get back.
    Good luck with your recovery and stay strong, And thanks for the support

  14. i had extra bone removed behind my tendon and on the side part but thankfully below it. i had the surgery on 8-26-2011 i wasnt in that much pain after 3 days or so (3 pills a day i was good). i asked my docs if i would b able to return to wrk on 9-16 (im a csm and i stand on my feet for 8 hrs a day) and they all said yes. so now 9-20 im in horrible pain. it started on 9-17 with pain starting under my baby toe working its way down the side (3/4 of the way) now after 3 days the pain has only gotten worse and im bak on pain meds which doesnt really help much. the pain has traveled to another location the front of my ankle. in the area that is worse it feels like someone stabbed me with a knife and is turning the blade. i can only walk desent if im wearing my working boots with 2 pairs of socks. anything else just isnt possible. my foot is really swollen and it continues to about my knee. the muscles throughout my leg is so sore even to move hurts and they feel like they are cramping and burning. :-(. i was thinking this pain could be related to me taking it easy for 20 days after the surgery and the only thing i wore was flip flops???? im plannin on making me a appointment come thursday. i hope nothing is wrong, i cant afford to be outta work any longer. they didnt tell me what they did and the only time ive seen my surgen was the day of the sugery. i went for me post op on the 7th and was seen by another doc and was told to come bak in 4-6 wks for a follow up, i just think that is weird. has anyone had this type of pain?

  15. Hi, I am 44 y.o. and have a surgery scheduled for Dec 30th to remove the haglunds deformity which resulted from trauma sustained 21 years ago whn i slipped down the stairs (feet went up high and achilles slammed down on the edge of the stair). I remember that pain like it was yesterday but I was 23 years old and blew it off.

    About 6 months ago I woke up unable to walk on it one morning. Dr. said immobilize it. I put it in a walking cast.

    Anyway, that really didn;t solve it - it still hurts. So reading all this makes me wonder if I should even bother to get the surgery. It seems a grim recovery and maybe even that you don’t recover at all?? My surgeon tells me he goes in from the side with hopes of not detaching any achilles tendon if possible. He’s just going for grinding down the bone.

    I am self employed and need to be able to walk preferably without a limp as I present professionally. Thankfully the 2 months following the surgery are super slow for me which is why i chose December 30th.

    What do you all think? Are you glad you did it? On a 1-10 my pain after many hours on it or walking etc is about a 4. Liveable but I sometimes think it’ll rise back up to a 7/8.

  16. Hi Dan,

    I just had surgery on my left foot for Haglund’s on 11/9/11, so it’s too early for me to tell you much about the recovery, but so far it’s been better than expected. Maybe even much better. All I can say is that you really need to find a good/great doctor, that has done these operations before and knows what he/she is doing. I feel very lucky to have found the guy that I did at Stanford. He did not have to de-attach any of my achilles, but did have to go in from both sides of my heel to clean up the “crab meat” from the frayed achilles and the bursa. He said the remaining achilles looks healthy and the attachment is good. He doesn’t expect any problems. His comments did make me wish I had taken care of this years earlier when it started bothering me.

    Here are a few suggestions for surgery day and the first handful of recovery days.

    1. Make sure the anesthesiologist uses a nerve-block on your leg during the procedure. It allows you to either get “twilight” sedation, or a lighter form of full-anestesia which is easier to come out of. In my case, I also had a procedure done at the same time to fix my big toe joint and straighten that toe (cut bone and add screw), so they had to flip me over in the middle of the operation. That required full-anestesia, but I came out of it and was fully coherent within an hour or so, and no nausea.

    2. Ask to be sent home with a nerve-block catheter/balloon-pump anesthetic system. You wear a small shoulder pack that contains a balloon full of medicine, that pumps into a catheter which is fed in through your skin to a particular nerve just above your knee. They insert this during the operation while you’re under general, so there is no pain to this option (except when you have to rip off a 12″ x 4″ patch of tape from your hairy leg). It lasts for 2 days, and I had minimal pain at any time since the operation. When it runs out, you remove it yourself and simply pull out the very fine catheter. I did supplement it with vicodin at the first inkling that pain may possibly be setting in, since I heard it’s easier to prevent pain from coming than it is to get rid of it once you have it. In hindsight, I’m not convinced it was necessary, and the headache from coming off vicodin may have been worse than the surgery pain.

    3. That would be another suggestion (in hindsight). Ask them to please shave your leg where they tape down the catheter for the home version of the nerve block. They didn’t shave mine, which is what caused my greatest pain since the surgery.

    4. Rent/buy a knee scooter in addition to crutches. It’s so easy to get around the house room-to-room. I only use crutches to get into the shower, or to go outside or up/down stairs.

    5. Get a 42″ long, extra large leg cast protector to keep your leg dry in the shower. You need the extra large size to get it over the heel of your cast. I’m keeping the same cast for 2 weeks until my post-op appointment. I certainly didn’t want to get it wet, which would be unhealthy and affect the healing. I have a bench in my shower. If you don’t, I’d suggest also getting a shower chair/stool/bench that you can sit on, and a hand-held sprayer if possible. With the extra-long cast protector, you can pull the seal up over you knee to your thigh area. This makes the seal vertical instead of horizontal (when your sitting down). Much less chance of having water leak down into your cast.

    6. Have someone around that is willing and patient enough to feed you and help you get things instead of having to get up-and-down constantly. I’m lucky enough to have an unbelievable wife, and she’s been amazing.

    7. As I mentioned, I stopped the vicodin after the second day. Vicodin did help me sleep at night, so I started taking a prescription of ambien (sleep aid) to help me sleep more comfortably through any minor pain or tingling.

    That’s all I can think of for now. I am trying to really be good about keeping my foot elevated above my heart for the first two-weeks after the surgery. I believe this initial investment will have a positive impact on the progression of my recovery by minimizing the swelling/pain. I’m fortunate enough to have a job that I can work from bed or the couch, with a phone and laptop.

    Good luck with it. I’ll try to keep you updated on progress.

  17. @edaguy, did you see Dr. Hunt at Stanford? I had the same surgery on 10/19/11 and I’m feeling pretty good. PWB with my boot.

  18. great website - i am 10 days post-op for haglund’s surgery. my tendon was bisected, debrided and anchored. there was quite a bit of bone removed.
    i seen some great advice here which i plan to use to optimize my recovery timeline. since the first few days after surgery i have not experience any great pain until the last two night when i started to get intense stabbing pain at night - has anyone else experienced this? could it be the nerves regrowing?
    additionally - does anyone have any input as to when i might be able to ride a bike again or play golf.
    thanks

  19. I simply wanted to thank you very much yet again. I’m not certain the things that I would’ve implemented in the absence of the entire basics provided by you regarding such problem. It absolutely was an absolute distressing problem in my opinion, however , finding out your specialised manner you dealt with the issue took me to weep for fulfillment. I’m happier for the work and in addition sincerely hope you find out what a powerful job you have been putting in training the mediocre ones via your blog. Most likely you haven’t met all of us.

  20. Is there anyone out there whose Haglunds was caused by a complete rupture of the OTHER achilles tendon? I never regained full use of the left foot (i.e. there is no strength in that tendon although it’s been surgically repaired) and I’m scared to let them operate on the right. Will I lose total ability to walk?

  21. my haglunds deformity was brought on by a cheap pair of dress shoes. higher heel area with no padding inside shoe under heel and no padding inside of shoe behind heel. partial achilies rupture finally happened on one heel and i couldnt walk for a few months without crutches. 6 months in could limp and walk quick for short distances. 1 yr in and i could run a little without too much pain and play some volleyball. 1.5 yrs in and i could run pretty good and play volleyball for an hour. 2 yrs in and played volleyball for 3 hours straight without too much problems. i did NOT do physical therapy or surgery for AT or for my HD, but i got a pair of crocs that have slowly given me back my life. men’s santa cruz is the model for what it’s worth hope it helps someone else.

  22. Two weeks ago I had 5cm of bone removed from the back of my heel (haglunds deformity) as well as my Achilles reattached and sewn back together. So far I am still in a leg cast and am in constant pain. I have had to have had my cast changed once and would love to know how ur recovery went. In a few weeks I am getting my other foot done and am really not looking forward to it. I am an avid figure skater and I am always active, walking, running, riding my bike and skating. Hating the sitting around.

  23. I am 5 months since surgery - a lot of pain remains and a bump on the inside of the heel. Tendon was anchored back in place and a lot of bone removed. But just not understanding why location of the pain and doctor just keeps saying it will improve. Anyone have anything like this? I am worried this is how it will be forever more - which means a great big fail and mistake that I did this.

  24. Hi I had my op on 6th March 2012, bone removed, bursar that was infected and very painful and torn ATendon, large lump removed off heel was in plaster 2weeks, then hinged boot for 2 weeks,then changed the angle and boot for another 4weeks started to WB , went this week told no boot now and start to walk as much as I feel I can, but not overdo it. Have to say had hardly any problems have a great surgeon and team. But…i have done short walks for two days and my knee has given out and now i am struggling with that , so annoying as felt I was about to get back to some normality. Have been off work since December 2011 and need to return soon, I work with young children so not ideal with this sort of problem. has anyone had knee problems too post op, what would be the best exercise to do?

  25. I had surgery on February 9, 2012 to remove haglunds deformity, two bone spurs and some calcified tendon. Had a post surgery cast, then a hard cast for a total of 7 weeks NWB, then a removable boot to begin PWB for another 4 weeks. Started PT at 11 weeks and am currently trying to get out of the boot. The pain is worse now than at any point following the surgery, primarily along the incision, but the outside of my ankle is swollen constantly, while the inside swells after having a shoe on for very long. I am having a very hard time bending my ankle. Has anyone else had this problem?

  26. Had my surgery on April 25th. Went well, stayed on pain pills for three days and now only take ibuprofen when I need, mostly once a day before bed. Three weeks and I am in a walking boot, NWB. Was told that in one more week, with good progress, could do PWB and light therapy. All expectations is 7 months and will be good to go, can hit the courts again. Do have a strange pain that runs down the outside of the foot from the heel to the toe. Was told this was nerve irritation from surgery and it will go away. All in all I am very happy with it so far. 43 yoa, love all sports and was tired of limping all the time. I hope everyone recovers quickly and safely.

  27. My doc told me not to use Motrin (my fav) because it delays tendon healing. I had already used it 4 days - bummer. Advil and a few other NSAIDs are also not good. He said Tylenol only. (or something stronger if needed at night) Check with your doc!

  28. I’ve also been told (or read) that NSAIDs like ibu are bad for tendon healing. Can’t remember the source, just treating it as if it’s true now!

  29. I injured both of my tendons in 1998 and finally found a surgeon who figured it out in 2009. I had the right one done in Nov of that year. It is a long hard road no doubt. I walked too much when I got into the walking cast and broke my foot. Today I decided to call tria to have my left one repaired. I am tired of limping and not being able to run. Is it worth it? Yes, I am 51 and am not done yet. I will not let this injury beat me. I have suffered with this way too long. It is not to be taken lightly but I will not live the rest of my life this way. Surgery in September. Here we go!!!

  30. Hi all

    This is my first post…. :-)

    I have recently a haglunds exostosis surgery (two weeks ago 9th May) and must say the surgery went fine, I have had next to no pain and only took the prescribed painkillers for one day. I guess I have my surgeon to thank for that, and being so good.

    I have had my first post op appointment and there is very little swelling/bruising and the wound seems to be healing fine. I am two weeks into a three week period of having to wear an open cast and I must say limping around with crutches is becoming increasingly tiresome(!). I can’t wait to have the pot removed (28th May).

    I also can’t wait to start running again, although I have to keep reminding myself to take my time. i’m very impatient and want to get back running as soon as possible, my main worry is that I try to do too much too soon.

    I was hoping posting on here would help share my frustrations with a bunch of people who have been in the same situation. I’d be very interested to hear what others have done in terms of recovery, prevention of haglunds reforming and at what timescale is it recommended to try physical activity such as running.

    Tony

  31. Hello,

    I am schedule for surgery (according to the doctor papers it states “haglunds deformity, Achilles tendons”). Of course, it is my right foot. My heel has been hurting for years but I ignored it. Until I started going to the gym and pushing myself to the limit and the pain just got worse I mastered walking without a limp even though I wanted to. My question is how long should I expect to be out of work (I’m a workaholic). And, how long before I can drive. Did I mention I am scared??????

  32. No need to be too frightened. My 18 year old son just had his surgery 1 week ago this past Friday. He will get his stitches out on Thursday of this week and is out of a cast and in a walking boot. The surgery is quick and recovery hopefully as well. Maybe this is a way of slowing you down if you are the self prescribed ‘workaholic’ that you are. Best of luck!!!!

  33. Hi folks
    thanks for sharing your stories. I had my Haglund’s exostosis surgery on my right foot on 22 Dec 2011. The surgeon went in from the medial side of my foot and removed the excess bone and bursa without detaching the tendon at all.
    Good luck TrickyTree - I think your experience so far has been very similar to mine. I had very little pain following surgery, apart from the inconvenience of being in a cast for nearly 4 weeks and not being able to drive.

    I didn’t have a lot of bruising after the cast came off although my tendon attachment still looks quite ‘lumpy’ compared with the left one and I don’t think it will ever look completely normal.

    My advice is to have physiotherapy as soon as you can and just be patient. Even though my tendon wasn’t ruptured or detached during surgery it has still taken me 5 months to get back to running again. I am now slowly increasing my running times by just a few weeks each week. Progress can be slow but its definitely been worth having the surgery as I was in so much pain in the lead up to it that I was facing the prospect of never running again.
    Good luck everyone.

  34. Hello All!!
    I had surgery for a partial achilles rupture that believe it or not I had no idea I had done. I noticed a large lump on the back of my ankle but it wasnt painful. t had been there for about a year when I noticed I was starting to have trouble pushing off with the ball of my foot while walking. It was painful and I started limping. I finally saw my regular doc in Feb 2012 who sent me to a surgeon who took one look at me and told me exactly what was wrong and that I needed surgery. I had to wait because I drive a school bus and couldnt take off 6wks for the cast I was gonna be wearing.

    He told me that he would remove the damaged part and then do a Flexor Hallus transfer from my big toe. Thankfully the tendon wasnt as bad as he thought but I also had the Haglund Deformity, and a retrocalcelal bursa and he lengthened the tendon and my flexor tendon of my big toe. Had no idea what all was gonna happen and told me he didnt do the transfer because I was so young and he wanted to leave it incase I needed it later in life. That was not something I wanted to hear.
    Had a cast for 6wks then a walking boot for another 6 weeks while doing therapy. Got boot off on the 14th of August and an ASO brace on and my heel is KILLING me. While at doc on Tues I told him about this and he pushed on tendon and asked if that hurt. Nope. Then he squeezed the side of my ankle in the back just above the heel pad and I about fell out of my chair from pain. He said well we broke that bone so thats why its so sore. I said what? Kinda sat there with my mouth open and he told me to come back in 6wks if not better and continue therapy for 6 more weeks.
    Heel and calf are really sore today and hope it is just from transition from boot to ASO and regular tennis shoe.
    Anyone else have same problem?

  35. Hi,

    I had both my haglund deformities removed on the 31/8/12, I was not put into plaster, just bandaged on both feet and given crutches. Was told to use cruthes for a couple of days! Have been back to see consultant today to have stiches removed, he was surprised to see me without cruthes but shuffling. I reminded him that he said only use for couple of days. I told him I was still in pain and walking was hard. He said that maybe I should have been in plaster after all, then said go back on crutches to start walking normally. I asked about returning to sport which he said another month.

    Reading all the other post I feel that maybe I’ve been left to get on with this by myself and hopefully haven’t done anymore damage. Any advice??

  36. Hi,everybody
    I had my surgery (no attaching the achiles with 2 little scarves at the both sides of the heel) on 19.06.2012 and now it is 3 months + after the surgery and i try to run a little bit.I do 2 km very slow run and it was ok but when i get back home i feel pain again.So I have not trained since then.My achilles is thicker than the fit one and that bother me.I am 22 and I’m an athlete and run abour 90 - 100 km a week before surgery.Wonder if I will be able to run the same mileage at quick speed again.And can someone at my age tell my how long the recovery period to go back at about 80-90% goes?Thank you in advance

  37. Wow. Reassuring to know that this condition and the burden it’s become is not isolated. Ruptured my Achilles (partial tear) playing rec league football about 12 years ago and my heel has never been the same. To be truthful, I’ve had pain in walking and running for about five years and live day to day with a lot of discomfort.

    As active as I am, and as active as my young children are now, I find myself dreading any sort of extended activity or quick sprinting. I meet their energy but I’m hurting for the entire day following.

    I’ll consider the surgery if there’s a high probability of a return to pain free activity. Not sure if I want to risk it if there’s minimal improvement or worse, complications.

    My question: Do any of you regret having the surgery?

    Thank you for your feedback. Best wishes to all for a healthy recovery.

  38. Hello everyone!

    I had my surgery about three weeks ago. It was the normal move the tendon out of the way, scrape down the bone, put everything back in order, and done. I’ve been dealing with daily discomfort for about 8 years and after a few google searches I realized this was actually something I could take care of. My doctor was AWESOME. We tried everything before surgery and nothing worked so he suggested removing the deformity. I’m pretty tough when it comes to pain and did not have to take pain killers since the surgery. How easy my post op recovery was has even surprised the doctor. I have been on crutches since the surgery and totally NWB, until about two days ago. I’m walking with a boot and a serious limp but the pain is tolerable, only taking a few ibuprofen.

    Anyway, my question is has anyone seen an extreme increase is your need for sleep? I was off of work and sleeping a lot which I assumed was mainly out of boredom, but even since I’ve been back to work I’ve been sleeping about 12 hours per night. Is this just part of the recovery?

    Thanks everyone!

  39. I am not sure what is normal, but i think this is part of the recovery. I am not sleeping 12 hrs but i wish i could. I had different surgery (debridement) 2 weeks ago, and I still can’t get a complete nights sleep because of boot and aching foot. If not for this I am sure I would sleep for 12 hrs.

  40. I have been in conservative treatment for Insertional Achilles Tendonitis since Feb. Did lots of PT on and off, all the time in pain. Doc recommended that I wear walking boot which I did for 10 weeks. Did not work got another doctor who recommended Haglund’s excession. Had surgery Oct 17th. On crutches for three weeks, then in boot alone 2 weeks and now try to walk in sandles or run shoes with back cut out. Doing PT for three weeks now. It is now Dec. 6th and I still have tightness, swelling and pain when I try and walk. Working on transfering wieght on to the heel and then to ball of the foot but every time I do this it feels like tearing on the insertion point of the heel. I was wondering if anyone else had problem with recovery like this. My surgery was just calcaneus bone and bursa removal. No repair of the tendon. Incision was on the lateral side of foot about the height of the ankle bone. How much longer will swelling continue and pain and tightness?

  41. I’m no Haglunds or Insertional Achilles Tendonitis expert, Tom Winter, but if your AT was removed from your heel=calcaneus then reattached, I think you’d be on a rehab schedule similar to us ATR folks. Trying to bear your body weight on the ball of “that” foot at ~7 weeks post-op is very aggressive, not surprising that “it feels like tearing on the insertion point of the heel”, ’cause it kind of IS!! Even if your OS worked around the insertion point, I’d back off that intensity. My blog tells a sad tale of a 1-month setback in my first-ATR post-op rehab from doing 3 or 4 1-leg heel raises at about TWELVE weeks post-op! No pain while I was overdoing, but a few hours later, it hurt more than the ATR (which isn’t saying much in my case), and it hurt for almost the full month while I returned to my hinged boot.

    My fave modern aggressive ATR rehab protocol — online at bit.ly/UWOProtocol — doesn’t “wean off boot” until EIGHT weeks post-either, and then they contemplate the possibility that the patient will have to go back to crutches for a little while. And without crutches, the boot-free “walking” is usually a very halting lop-sided gimp-shuffle that avoides all DF and CERTAINLY avoids loading the calf-and-AT with full body weight, as you’re doing (with pain).

    None of this constitutes a “problem with recovery” in my book, just unrealistic expectations about recovery.

    The duration of swelling and discomfort and stiffness varies hugely between patients. I posted a whole blog page with a title like “This Inflammation is getting OLD!”, ’cause mine lasted several weeks longer than I’d expected. The swelling brings a lot of discomfort and stiffness (and ROM limitation) all by itself, as I discovered later from a bone bruise on the shin of my OTHER leg, which ended up feeling a lot like ATR rehab — see my blog (somewhere) for details.

  42. I am 9 weeks post surgery and am now wishing I hadn’t had the surgery. Pain now is worse than prior to surgery. In the last week it has involved my heel, toes, and my calf. Sometimes the pain radiates to my hip. I was very active prior to the surgery, and was training to run a 1/2 marathon when I had to stop. Since surgery I have gone to one Zumba class, this after my doc said all restrictions were lifted., Needless to say it didn’t work out well. I am still icing every night, and almost feel as if I have restless leg syndrome now. I cannot keep my lower leg still due to the throbbing. Im very discouraged by all this. I’m 47 years old and was very actiive, now I feel like a slug and wishing I had never had surgery.

  43. Hang in, teresa! 9 weeks is still a very early and still-wounded time. I’m sure others will chime in with very similar stories that turned out well, and I’ve had two of my own and read dozens of them. Keep progressing incrementally, and try to focus on the improvements — I bet there are a bunch, buried in the frustration that there aren’t more and sooner. Try not to let the mental game beat you up while you’re almost certainly slowly winning the physical game.

  44. My best wishes to you Teresa. The hardest part is enduring the frustration, however you will get through these just hang in there. Like Norm says the smallest improvements do add up. He is such a great advocate to this blog. Ryan too. Kudos to both of you Norm & Ryan! Looks like you, Teresa endured the pain months ago prior to your surgery. It sounds to me like surgery was your best option to repair the Haglunds. Zumba at 9 weeks is a bit extreme and I’d take caution with that. There are many other ways to keep active and not jepordize the achilles. I looked at my recovery as a way to improve my body in other areas. Like: pull ups I can do 10, chest to ground full push ups 100 + no sets, picked up 1/4 inch on my biceps. So concentrate on other areas of weakness and not the weakness of your AT as you continue your AT physical Therapy. This helped me.

  45. Teresa I wish you a speedy and smooth recovery. Our recoveries are a slow process to get to where you want to be, and it can be frustrating at times. I try to focus on every positive gain no matter how small and I’m sure you are making some gains also.

    I’m 9 weeks post-op and I wouldn’t be able to do a Zumba class (Although I doubt I would of been able to do a Zumba class before surgery lol) I still have issues standing up and walking all day at my job. I’m doing MY PT everyday and my leg swells and throbs at times to, but I’m also seeing improvements in my endurance, ROM, and swelling (less) each day, and I’m sure you are making improvements also. Good luck.

  46. Teresa, I second the comments above wishing you the best. I am not yet 9 weeks post op, but know that even at 9 weeks Zumba will not be possible (although like Kevin it may never have been). I think we just need to take things slowly. I am making use of some dumbbells that have been collecting dust in my basement, and hopeful will see some results of this.

  47. Teresa, I’m a couple of weeks ahead of you and don’t feel Zumba class would be doable at nine weeks. My PT tells me this is a “managed” recovery. He’d be worried if suddenly my ROM increased to much. Follow a plan with weekly goals - sometimes those goals seem very small but it all adds up.

    The physical therapist told me my knee would flex to the wall three weeks after I started with him. He was bang on and I feel good about this progress. It would not have been beneficial (in fact it would have been somewhat harmful) to achieve this any sooner.

    Beckham took over six months to return to his sport. He’s an elite athlete with the best care and it was his full time job to “get better”.

    Unfortunately there’s not short cuts to an ATR recovery. Good luck with your recovery.

  48. I have been athletic all of my life including playing tennis, basketball, etc. More than this I have been an avid runner and triathlete having completed multiple marathons and one IronMan.
    My first Haglund’s issue appeared in my right heel many years ago. And during this time span, the pain would be present off and on. Fortunately, the pain was more off than on. I was able to manage it with rest, etc.(of course the resting part was a killer). During the pain free times, I was able to train and compete. Finally, in Sept.2011, the pain returned in my right heel and never left me. Then in March, 2012 for the first time I had pain in the left heel which never resovled with conservative management. In the spring of 2012, I went to an MD who correctly diagnosed my problem of bilateral haglund’s and calcific tendonosis of the Achilles. During these months from Sept.2011 until June, 2012, I hardly ran and had pain even with walking as well as stiffness and general missery.
    I resaerch surgeons and spoke with runners who had had the surgery. From the information that I recieved, I knew that the only way to get lasting relief was through a surgical correction. On June 18th I had the right foot repaired which included a Haglund’s resection, an Achilles debridement, and an Achilles reattachment. Then on Oct.1st I had the same surgery for the left.
    Like so many people, I was in a cast for 15 days followed by a walking boot for 4-5 weeks. I have done the PT as presrcibed. And tried to gradually increase cycling and elliptycal training.
    Now that I am 6 months out from the right heel surgery, I have had moments when the heel and Achilles have felt great and ready to run. However, there have been times when it still hurt and/or was stiff. So, I know that I am not 100% in this foot.
    The left foot is slight past 2 and 1/2 months post op and has a long way to go.
    One thing I do recall is that the surgeon told me that in 3 months I would be walking fairly well, running some by 6 months, and after one year not thinking about it anymore ( for as we all know, the pain and thought of recovery and returning to running is constantly on our minds).
    I suspect that, like most who have posted, I too am a little impatient and want to be well…..now! But, I resolve to give the healing of the heel time. I want to get back to running and hopefully competing.
    In the mean time, I will swim, cycle and elliptycal as tolerated, strenght train, and vicariously watch all my buddies run like the wind.

  49. Good luck and good healing to all, and a happy Dark Time, too!

  50. Are there any non-athletic patients out there? I read all these blogs and most Haglund surgery patients are runners
    or fitness trainers or young people. I have climbed trees for most of my life and now require this surgery on both feet. After reading these blogs I feel my career is over. I am 57
    years old and I ma sure ‘if’ I am able to recover; I will never
    be able to put my feet under that kind of pressure again.
    Also, how do I find a ‘good’ surgeon versus one who doesn’t use the best options in surgery? I live in Cincinnati.
    I have seen a foot specialist and want to do the AT removal. I feel that will besomething I never recover from and maybe the srape is the best option?

  51. I know an excellent surgeon. He is an orthopedic surgeon with a fellowship in foot & ankle with emphasis on achilles problems and treatment.
    Dr. Benjamin Stevens with Springfield Clinic Ortho. Dept Springfield, Il. I ruptured my achilles 12/15/12 and am currently in his care.

  52. kahome, re. your pain and stretching 4 months post surgery……My physician and phyiscal therapist had me begin stretching as soon as my cast was removed at 15 days. The initial stretching was easy, gentle, and invoved minimal range of motion. As time passed and as more healing occur, the stretching became more aggressive. My right foot is 7 months post surgery, has full range of motion, full stretching without pain, and full walking without pain. I believe that it is 95-98% well. My left foot is 3and 1/2 months post surgery. The stretching has become fairly aggressive, range of motion about 80-90 of normal and my gait at times normal and at times still painful with a limp.But, I can see improvement and have hope of a well left leg in 1, 2, or 3 more months.
    I have been told that 3 months after surgery there is little chance of the Achilles pulling off of the heel where it was reattached. I don’t know about a rupture. I supose if you put enough force on it that it will rupture.
    Anyway, this is a long slow process to recovery and wellness. People that I have personally spoken with tell me that, given time, they were well and back to full activity.

  53. I had partial rupture of Achilles surgery on 12/31/12.
    I was none weight bearing for 3 weeks and started physical therapy on 2/9/13.
    Whenever i have pain in my foot and ankle I know it’s time to put my foot up.
    I have decided , after a lot of frustration that I really like my foot and that I must listen when it’s hurting. Does not help to push through to get things done. Its a good lesson I suppose. I just hope that everyday is a little better.

  54. Cuda, thank you. I’m going to consult with a surgeon (2nd opinion) next week. After reading the above I’m totally freaked out. I am one to follow the Drs. order as well. The 2nd surgeon has done surgeries on many people I know. And is also very well respected as a “perfectionist” when it comes to his procedures. I work at a prison and ground pound on concrete daily. Climbing stairs and running to emergencies is a part of life. 15 years of wearing safety shoes that are rigid have ruined my heels and I have the wonderful Haglunds Deformity. I don’t want this surgery to end my career so I’m nervous. But I believe with the right surgeon and proper aftercare I’ll be good to go… hopefully!

  55. Hi,

    I was scheduled for Haglund deformity operation this coming 14 Mar. I would like to know how the procedures or how operation process goes.

    The doctor I consult said he will chop off a chuck of calcaneous bone and no injury to the achilles tendon. He told me I will be admitted in the hospital for 3 to 4 days and will be on cast for period of 3 weeks before starting physio therapy. From what I read, I think 4 weeks recovery period sound impossible. May I know your opinion/what is the expected time frame for recovery.

    I had been having swelling around the area where the calcaneous bone protude to my tendon.

    Hope someone could clear my doubts.

    Thanks

    Sue

  56. I had arthroscopic Haglund’s repair and some debridement of small partial tears of the Achilles on 2/27/13.

    At my first post-op check-up, the surgeon told me to start stretching the foot and moving my toes and working toward being able to put my foot in a walking boot. That was at 8 days post surgery and I was stunned as my foot was still very swollen and tender, I had no range of motion and could barely wiggle my toes.

    I’m 15 days post-op and completely non- weight bearing. I start physical therapy tomorrow.

    I have had some improvement in ROM of both the foot and toes, but still cannot stretch my foot to 90% and feel like I am pretty far from being able to put my foot in a boot. My foot, and toes especially, are ice cold much of the time and still swollen. My big toe in particular feels like it has cords pulling on it. All of my toes feel very strange.

    After some stretching, I have felt like progress was made, but each time I stretch is like first time again, I don’t seem to retain any gains.

    I wish the doctor’s would spend a little more time explaining what to expect in terms of sensations and abilities. I’d appreciate it if someone who has been through this could tell me that this is normal, that I should not be able to flatten the foot yet and that the tingles and pulling and freezing cold foot etc is normal. I appreciate any experiences that members would like to share. Thanks.

  57. The tingles and pulling seem to be normal as I experienced them in the first few weeks/months and now don’t. I don’t know about the cold foot though. I’m recovering from surgery on the other foot (2 weeks) and my foot is pretty warm. However, I am in T3xas and the outside temp is pretty warm so I’m not sure if that’s a factor. Most doctors just see patients for a few minutes a few times after surgery. I think your physical therapist will be able to help a lot in determining if anything seems out of the ordinary or is concerning.

    (Haha…I just hit submit comment and it says: “Sorry, your comment has been rejected because it contains one or more of the following words: t3xas.

    Please try posting your comment again, but without these words.” But I spelled the state name correctly.

  58. I am a very active person, marathoner, Physical Education teacher,and 55. I am in excellent condition except for the haglunds etc.. Which has hobbled me. I haven’t been able to “push off” for the last year and have tried all other conservative measures to no avail.i miss running so much and I could cry when I see people popping out at the start of our spring here in the northeast with their running shoes on and a hop in their step! So, I have met with a. Physician in NYC. from HSS. I am so frightened about the surgery. Are there any recovering runners ( senior runners my age) who have had the surgery, are glad they did and are back to running and activities? Has anyone used docs from the Hospital for Special Surgery in NYC.?Please advise.

  59. Hello All ~
    I had surgery on January 28th for Haglund’s Deformity with Achilles debridement/repair. I had started marathons just last year and progressed quickly to runs of up to 40 miles until razor-like pain in my heels sent me to a local clinic. That doctor told me I would never run again. After a few more doctors and some physical therapy, I got a referral to see a specialist in this surgery.
    The Orthopedic Surgeon I see treats many athletes. in fact, our main goal with deciding on doing the surgery was to get me back to running trail marathons. I should add that i had this very same surgery at 12 which sidelined a very successful soccer career on a traveling team. I didn’t do more than jog for years.
    My main point here is to pass on is part of his post-surgery treatment plan, which has proven to be successful for the athletes he’s treated and I hope for myself.
    He has a very strict post-surgery protocol that includes absolutely NO weight bearing for 8 full weeks. I came out of the cast at three weeks out and into a boot to protect and immobilize my foot and heel, and I am allowed to stretch it a little every day, but not to move it more than 30 degrees and to avoid attempting a neutral 90 degree position.
    I am at six weeks and feel very strong in that when I do stretch it for just a few minutes every day, the mobility continues to increase in all directions without forcing it and completely without pain.
    In light of the education they’ve provided me,I feel strongly that this is the key to healing well and look forward to walking with the boot and physical therapy in two more weeks.
    I have great confidence in my doctor and physical therapist in their estimation that I could be running half-marathons non-competitively by the end of summer.
    Really the key seems to be to get a really solid healing process completed on that Achilles where it was detached in avoiding later injury or setbacks in the recovery process. I spoke to two semi-pro athletes that work for him who had the same surgery and they said the same thing.
    So ask your doctors - rushing to the weight bearing stage could be crippling and defeat the purpose of the surgery entirely creating other problems or sending you back to square one with a weak non-functioning tendon.
    Good Luck To You All ~
    MM

  60. Fascinating, MM! I wonder if the Haglund’s surgery — or having an AT that’s surgically reattached to the heel bone — is different enough from normal ATR surgery (not to even MENTION non-op ATR treatment!) that a very different rehab approach is optimal. It would be great if your OS put his opinion to the test of a randomized trial, or at least published his non-randomized results, maybe demonstrating that they’re better than the published early-WB results.

    Have you seen the studies on early post-ATR-op WB, on this site’s Studies and Protocols page? I don’t find them a total Slam Dunk for early WB, but they don’t seem to give ANY support to your OS’s theory that 8 wks of NWB brings any benefit at all. Again, those are random normal ATRs, not Haglund’s ops, and maybe few or none had the AT reattached to the heel bone, and maybe that makes a huge difference.

    But at the very least, it seems dangerous (& a major nuisance, too!) to apply his theory to post-ATR-op patients. And for post-ATR-NON-op patients, it seems pretty clear that 8 weeks of NWB immobilization is poison, directly associated with the unacceptably high rerupture rates of our parent’s (& granddad’s) “conservative casting” for ATRs. A new metastudy of op vs non-op (Feb. 2012) presents pretty solid evidence for that relationship: rerupture rates are comparable between op and fast non-op (e.g. like bit.ly/UWOProtocol ), but SLOW non-op patients had 8.5 more reruptures per 100 than post-op patients. Again, not Haglund’s patients.

  61. Hi, I had Haglund’s surgery Oct. 17th and am experiencing a very slow recovery. My surgery was non orthoscopic and was on the right heel laterial side of foot, incision about 1 inches. I was in a boot for 4 weeks after and then hobbled around until I noticed that the scar was not healing like the doc said it would and sure enough it was oozing pus and was infected. This was third week of Dec. I was on anti-bios for 4 weeks - a kind that clears up urinary tract inflections. After that I had lots of swelling in the heel especially on the incision side and the scar did not settle down at all. After any sort of stretch the whole heel would swell bright red like a ping pong ball was growing out of my heel. I had almost constant pain most notibly at the center of the heel just above the fat pad. Motion was possible and even enjoyable but I would pay for it after a couple of hours and the pain would be very sharp,very scary. An example of a pre and post surgery symptom was pain in the lower rear heel when I pushed the accelerator driving the car (I use to drive my car for the better part of the winter with my left foot). Recovery was unbelievably slow with no progress for months. I could do PT but eventually failed all my goals. The most freightening part was having to consistently lower my PT exercises to littler and littler. Eventually I gave up PT and went to riding a bike with low tension. I would ride almost everyday for an hour and even rode on the streets. However walking was still very discouraging as I tried insoles and boots and lifts (never ever effective) over and over in very combination. The docs (2 opinions - I have seen through my whole ordeal stretching back over 1 and half years now, 5 surgeons, 1 foot doc, 2 PT’s, and an acupuncturist) now say that the next step is a reattachment surgery which I have been trying to avoid. I really don’t know if the surgery was necessary but I did have an enlarged bursa and now that is gone. Pre surgery I wore a boot for 10 weeks and that seemed to do nothing - and it was very painful so I wonder about the effectiveness of that. I would have like to have gone much, much slower on the intial PT when I did not know what type of Achilles problem I had. I wish I would have known it was insertional right off the bat and rest much more than I did, but rather on advice of one doc. doing non-insertional PT stretching. I think a good treatment for me would have been light stretch with bike work and the bike work before stretch. Looking back I can’t believe trained PT’s had me doing stretches like weighted wall squats without warm up first on the bike. Looking back I would stop a lot of the stretching and go to non load movement. Also post surgery it is important since we are not talking about a big area there to make sure the scar is loose and not attached or swollen too much as you will get referial pain causes you to tighten you calf muscles which only leads to more stress on the tendon. Another very important thing I have discoveried just recently is that as long as you cannot rise up on your toes as you would in a normal walking gait, you will be putting further stress on the tendon as you walk peg leg. This is to be avoided I think as walking like just puts more tension on the tendon and you will be doing yourself more harm than good. I think a lot of this situation occurred with me as I walked durnig the summer in the boot. I think you have to keep the leg/calf/foot active and lengthening but you also should avoid too much direct pull on the achilles as it needs to heal first. I would be very interested in what other think of my observations.

  62. A follow up report….
    It has been 9 and 1/2 months since I had my right Haglund’ s removed and Achilles Tendon debridement and 6 months since the same sugery on the left.
    This entire process, to say the least, has been VERY long but expected. I can say that my right foot is 100% recovered. Only occasionally I have slight stiffness in the Achilles after getting up in the morning or after resting from a workout….sort of normal I believe.
    Now the left foot which has been 6 months……At times I have no pain at all, at other times mild pain. So, almost 2 weeks ago I begain to walk/run with short, slow running intervals. I have done this 5 times. Afterward, my Achilles and heel are a little sore and again the next day as well. So, I say to myself “should I continue hoping that this Pain will burn itself out or should I back off for a few more weks and restart?”
    Since the last time I ran was on May 19, 2012, I am eager to get back at it, way too much lost time. So, right now I am planning to continue the walk/run hoping the pain eases and the muscles become stronger which will lead to more running without the walking.
    I also want to note that I am cycling and ellipticalling fine without pain.
    I hope these words serve to encourage others as time, proper PT, and slowly progressing back will get the job done. These orthopedic issues just take a very long time to heal and then to regain the strenght needed to function properly.

  63. Annie:

    I am 65 and been running with a severe heel tendon problem for several years. I took a year off and tried alternative treatments with no success. Three weeks ago I had surgery. The heel was opened up, the tendon detached, the heel bone was chiseled down and reshaped and the tendon was re-attached. Pain pills for two days and no pain after that. Cruches for an estimated 90 days but I heal fast so hope to shorten that time line. If I could go back and redo the timing I would have opted for the surgery 16 months ago. Looking forward to get back on the road this summer. Go for it!

  64. I am 65 and been running with a severe heel tendon problem for several years. I took a year off and tried alternative treatments with no success. Three weeks ago I had surgery. The heel was opened up, the tendon detached, the heel bone was chiseled down and reshaped and the tendon was re-attached. Pain pills for two days and no pain after that. Cruches for an estimated 90 days but I heal fast so hope to shorten that time line. If I could go back and redo the timing I would have opted for the surgery 16 months ago. Looking forward to get back on the road this summer. Go for it!

  65. Great blog. I am six weeks post-Haglund’s, Achille’s tendon repair and bursa removal. They removed a lot of bone and cartilage. I was in the hospital overnight post-surgery, and had a half-cast put on the next day. Stitch removal and a new cast at 3 weeks — I was healing very well. I get my second cast off next Tuesday which will mean 7 weeks NWB. The pain was minimal after 3 days and I stopped my “little white pills” after 5 days. My biggest problem has been emotional with the NWB. I can’t use crutches so have been using a roll-about. But I was ordered to not shower to protect the cast, so I have been getting sponge-baths from my spouse. Luckily I have been able to work with transportation hassles of not being able to get my scooter in and out of the car. I am a minister and can preach sitting down. My world has shrunk to the first floor of my house and occasional car rides. I am not an athlete but was in the process of a major weight loss program. Luckily I have even lost a few pounds since I have been paranoid about food intake. I can’t wait to get stationary cycling, ergometer at the gym and weight training. I really think we have to bring our patience along when we get this done. I determined to do as the Dr. ordered (I had mine done at Mayo, which is near where I live), so I know he is excellent. But the impatience and emotional part is the toughest.

  66. I´m having my Haglund surgery next week and i am scared to death of your storries. 12 month recovery is a long time. On the other side, I have been in pain the last 1½year and I have realized, Haglund won´t dissapear without surgery.
    For the last ½ year I haven´t been able to wear shoes and now I can´t nearly walk.
    I am from Denmark and doesn´t understand all your acronyms. will you please tell me what NWB, FWB, ROM, OS, PT is?
    What about stretching, is it a good idea? I get som many different oppinions from the doctors.
    Thanks.

  67. @ birgitte

    NWB- Non weight bearing. Applying no weight to this foot while using crutches, walking, etc. Only using your healthy foot while in crutches.

    FWB- Full weight bearing. No crutches, ability to stand on boot feet in a healthy way.

    ROM- Range of Motion.

    OS- ? Sorry, I’m not sure what this is either..

    PT- Physical Therapy.

  68. OS is otrtho surgeon

  69. I just found this blog yesterday, and I am thrilled with the content. I have had Achilles tendonitis for the past several years with a couple of “huge” (as my podiatrist put it) heel spurs. I have never heard the Heglund’s condition mentioned, but the surgery sounds like what the podiatrist said he will do for the tendonitis.

    I first went to the podiatrist about my Achilles pain in 2009. I went through all the treatment….PT, boot, night splints, etc., but I really got no relief from the pain. He then told me I needed surgery, but I decided against it and never went back until just last month. I finally realized that this wasn’t going to get any better and it was becoming very, very debillitating and causing some serious quality of life issues. So back I went to the podiatrist and he immediately said (again) that I needed surgery.

    I don’t know anyone personally who has had this type of surgery, so it is great to hear about others’ experiences. I am going to go to an OS that specializes and feet and ankles for a second opinion to make sure the surgery is necessary. Who knows, I may feel more comfortable having him do the surgery….don’t know about that yet. I’m trying to mentally prepare for the long recovery. Ugh!

    Thanks again for all the information. I would love to hear from someone who is 12 months post-op to make sure full recovery is in the cards!

  70. Anna,

    I had the surgery for a similar injury May 20 after three years of Achilles issues. The doctor cut off a huge chunk of bone, repaired the torn Achilles, and inserted four screws.

    My doctor could not guarantee a 100% back to running marathons recovery. She did however say that biking and hiking were probably a sure thing.

    Have you had a MRI? I would definitely recommend an OS for this type of injury. Ask a lot of questions.

    Like you, the bone spur was affecting daily activities and quality of life. Walking, going up stairs, gardening, driving, and lifting were all painful. I am feeling positive about recovery! Next week, I am going to start putting weight on my leg to get off the crutches. Physical therapy is helping my range of motion. I’m taking it day by day.

    Hope this helps. There are others on the blog who have recovered successfully from this type of surgery.

  71. Hi all, I was currently in the process of joining the army but started to get pain in both my heels. I later found out I was haglunds. I have been to see a doc and they are doing the surgery on one foot at a time. my op date is mid august and im nervous as hell… It has been my dream as a child to join the Army and since this I feel like I have hit a brick wall. The doctor said that he doesn’t feel wouldn’t need to remove the tendon to remove the 2inch pieces of bone. My main worry is. will I be able to run again ?and also how long do you feel it would take until I will be fully recovered ?

    thank you

  72. I am not alot of help in talking recovery as I’m only one week in recovery. Can only say do not be afraid. Surgery was ok with minimal pain afterwards. Intending to do as I’m told despite the frustration. Have first appointment post surgery on Tuesday, there I will find out the extent of the problem and care plan involved. Wish me luck!

  73. Hi, I am now 5 weeks after my surgery and I can only say the same as Francess, dont fear the surgery. I nearly had no pain and only got pills the first two days.
    Via arthroscopic surgery the surgeon removed a large piece of the heel bone. Released achillles tendon, shaved it down and removed the bursa.
    The operation was 1½ hours, I followed it on the monitor and was in local anesthesia.
    After 3 weeks without any NWB i started at my PT and everything seems fine. I train every day, especially agility and movement in the ankle joint. A little more weight on the leg every day, now about 25%.
    But be patient, this is not 6-8 weeks, rehabilitation period is probably closer 6-12 months.
    If you realy have pain and have a Haglund, don´t waste time, don´t fear the surgery. Good luck to everybody.

  74. @Joshua
    At my operation they did not need to remove the tendon from the calcaneus and reattach. There was plenty af space to remove the heelbone deformity.
    I just had a lot af scar tissue they had to loosen and “shave down” at the tendon, before they was able to remove the the Haglund.
    I think the rehabilitation is much easier if they keep the tendon intact.

  75. Hello, thanks for your comments. Im also only 20 and from what my surgeon said he is shocked to see me in there getting the surgery at my age as he said he ha never seen someone of my age in the surgery with this problem. Im going in the surgery tomorrow for a pre op assessment so should find out more about tomorrow. Im expecting surgery in about 3 weeks.

  76. Its been 7 weeks since they removed the bump and part of my heel bone. I start physical therapy tomorrow. Just got the cast off on Monday. The side of my foot is still numb and when I put a little weight on it or extend it out straight, I have tingling in my side of foot that is usually numb. Is this normal? How long does it take once you start physical therapy before you can walk without a walker or crutch?

  77. Fitness Genie,
    Had the same surgery 10 weeks ago. The numbness and tingling are typical. My PT described it as the nerve endings getting back to normal after inactivity. I was NWB for six weeks. It took about a week to shed the crutches. PT is really helping, ROM back to normal except when my foot turns up. You’ll be amazed at your jump in mobility during this phase. I am up to 3 mile walks in the boot and am using a spin bike daily with a little resistance. Soreness and swelling at the end of the day are also normal per therapist especially if you are working full time. (I went back to work the week after surgery) If I wake up in the morning with soreness, I ease off for the day. So far, this strategy seems to be aiding recovery. Icing is also part of daily routine. Good luck in your recovery!

  78. Had my first PT appt. He has me doing stretches and moving foot in circles to increase ROM. Im still scared to step down into my heel since it is tender. I can tolerate weight on my toes. Still a bit of swelling so dont want to push it. Should I still use the knee walker or just go for it and use the walker? Not too stable on the crutches.

  79. I’m 65 and not athletic at all. I’m tired of pain when walking and I want to continue to travel internationally for a lot more years to come. I’ve had custom orthotics (from podiatrists) for years. I finally decided to consult an orthopedic surgeon (specializing in heels and ankles) who was recommended by my dermatologist.

    For people like me, I’d suggest a physical therapy appointment BEFORE surgery to learn how to use the crutches. My vanity was a bit hurt when the therapist suggested I might want to use a walker after surgery because I wasn’t very steady on the crutches she had me practicing on. I’m so glad that I borrowed a walker and used it for the week that my foot and leg was in a splint. It gave me confidence that I’d be safe as I walked around in the house. When using crutches I learned a little “ditty” to remind me how to go up and down stairs. “Good leg goes UP to heaven. Bad leg goes DOWN to hell.” I’m still whispering it to myself since it’s only been 2.5 weeks since my surgery.

    Good luck non-athletic friends!

  80. Now it is 9 weeks since I had my surgery. I can walk slowly now (some rigid) and do my PT exercises every day. I think I’m making great progress.
    I have a big problem, one of the main reasons why I got the surgery, I still can not wear shoes with heel caps. My skin and the entire heel area is very sensitive.The doctors said, before the operation, it was because of the highly inflamed bursa and Haglunds but now it is removed, and I have the same pain?
    It’s summer, and I can use sandals and “Birkenstock” slippers, but it’s hard to do proper cycling and other exercises without heel caps. And autumn and winter is coming too …
    Do you have any suggestions and is there anyone here who has the same problem?
    Thanks

  81. Just got the surgery done yesterday and was home within 10 hours of arriving at the hospital. Im currently in a cast from the knee down and have crutches. I can safely say that the pain is not at all bad as I expected and have only had one paracetamal. Im going back in a couple of weeks to get the sutchers out and get a walking boot. so im hoping that this wont be a long recovery.

  82. 8 days post surgery, 31 years old, had right heel fracture and surgeon removed calcaneal exostosis, shaved heel down, and was more involved with achilles than previously thought; pretty sure we had to anchor (re-anchor?) the achilles. At any rate, no real need for the pain killers since day two or three and I want so badly to put weight on my foot but my achilles feels short/tight and weak when I put even the slightest pressure on it. No cast, just walking boot (and crutches). Anyone remember this stage of their recovery? Limited to no swelling, getting stitches out in a week (hopefully). I know I won’t be playing basketball for a few months still but I want to be at least PWB where I can get out of the house and do something (upper body workout at gym, etc).

  83. Update: Week 14
    Never got a blog so I thought this may be useful for those of us who have had Haglund’s surgery and repair. In my case, this was a running injury. The tendon was partially torn last August. I had to wait until finishing college up in May to have surgery. This has been a long journey!
    Walking has been going well. I’ve progressed to five mile hikes with some incline. Stationary biking seems to loosen up the AT quite a bit. I’m starting to stand on my bike with more and more resistance. My PT has included the stair climber for short periods as well. In the past week, I’ve lost my limp for the most part and seem to be walking much faster. Planning on going for a couple of steeper hikes this weekend. Can’t wait to start running again! The swelling and pain has decreased a lot in the past couple of weeks; being active (within reason) seems to be helping recovery.

  84. Cuda,
    Follow up…….it has been 14.5 months since my rt. Haglund’s and Achilles’ tendon surgery and 11 months since the left was operated upon.
    I started running late March with a gradual build up from walk/ run to run only. I built up to 3 or 4 days a week of running with a longest run of 12 miles. Also, I did several successful Brick work outs with the longest of 24 miles on the bike followed by 5 miles of running.
    I was doing well and could not have been happier as the heel and Achilles pain had totally resolved, and the mild stiffness I had in the Achilles had settled down as well.
    THEN I had a bike wreck 4 and a half weeks ago which caused iliopsoas tendinitis, left side.
    I could not be more angry with myself. I was doing so well. Now I am rehabbing this injury.
    Anyway, the point is that you will recover from heel and Achilles’ tendon surgery with good return to physical activity. It just takes TIME and PATIENCE.

  85. Little update, got the surgery on the 19th august and got my cast and stitches of last night. I have been put into a walking boot and have been told I should be able to walk without the boot in about 3 weeks. my foot is quite swollen and also feels weird, I cant really move it that much too. I hope it wont be too long as I need to have my right foot done also.

  86. It has been 11 weeks since I had the surgery for removal of bump, deattach achilles and partial removal of heel bone. The incision is not completely heeled and it is very tender. After being on my feet (I work retail) for a couple of hours I am in lots of pain. Im taking morer pain pills now than I did after the surgery. Is this normal or what should I be doing besides my PT exercises to get rid of this tenderness and speed up the incision healing time. Tired of hurting.

  87. Hi Karen, we are approximately the same place in our rehabilitation. I had my surgery on June 20.
    I am also frustrated,worried and in lots of pain. The first weeks after surgery went well, I thought “okay, no pain… 3 months and you walks perfect”.
    When I started at work after 7 weeks and walked regulary the pain started in earnest.
    I am also taking pills almost every day now and sleeps 1½-2 hours after work, totaly exhausted. The calcanius bone is extremely sensitive, I almost can´t wear shoes (not heel caps at all) and even socks hurts. Achilles is thick and sore. I am training by a physiotherapist once a week and are in gym with weights and elastic bands (light)) twice. Cycling and rowing is fine but as soon as I get weight on the foot, walking, standing, it hurts. Ballance exercises are very difficult and I still can´t stand on one leg. It is also very difficult to walk down the stairs.
    It is hard to know if you train too much or too little? My PT says ballance and strength is the most important, but it hurts. Next week I’m going to 3 month review with X-ray and ultrasound. I fear inflammation.
    Maybe it is “normal” with the slow and painful rehabilitation? I need good answers from the doctors next week.
    Sorry for my spelling :-( I am Danish

  88. I went through a similar phase in my recovery. My work required that I was on my feet all day long. My foot would get profoundly sore and by the end of the day I was a wreck. But slowly, with each passing day the pain seemed to subside. I’m now at week 12 and I’m mostly pain free. It still gets sore but less than it was 2 weeks ago and much less than 3 or 4 weeks ago. So hang in there, if you have no complications you’ll notice your improvement. Another challenge is working out the scar tissue, that too will come with time (and effort).

  89. Hi all, this is my first post. My husband has this condition and has a doctor’s appointment next week. The surgery….yikes! Don’t know if he is up for this. He has been plagued with pain from this “bump” and even sidelined from work and golf for weeks at a time off and on for the last 5 years. My question is what type of doctor preformed your surgeries ? Podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon? My husband went to an Ortho doctor in June and he really didn’t seem too interested in his pump bump. But my husband woke up Friday morning and could not walk or find a comfortable position. There was no injury or excessive walking in the days leading to his pain. He works a very physical job. Any thoughts?

  90. Hi Mimi,

    I had tendonosis of my right achilles (microscopic tears from overuse) for about 14 months before I suffered a partial rupture this summer simply walking around. I don’t remember doing anything specific but all at once I could not take another step. I had surgery to fix it about 30 days ago and may start physical therapy after I see my doctor this week.

    I’ve heard of people suffering with tendon issues for years and it’s very difficult. I’d advise your husband to find the best surgeon he can — one who’s done this procedure many times and has had high success rates.

    I had an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in ankle/tendon issues do mine (I live near Philadelphia, Pa.) I saw a podiatrist for over a year for my tendonosis and was very disappointed with his care. As I approach my 30 day post-op mark I am glad I had the surgery and glad I chose a good doctor because it feels like finally — FINALLY — I am getting better.

    I will tell you that the first few weeks post-op were difficult because I’ve been on crutches — the first two weeks non weight bearing on my operated foot. Now that I’m almost one month post-op i am able to put weight on my operated foot and am looking forward to starting physical therapy.

    Like many who’ve suffered with Achilles tendonosis/tendonopathy, I did try a non-surgical approach for over a year and, while I’ve read it does work for some people, it did not work for me. Five years is a very long time to feel so badly with an injury that has a very good surgical success rate. (i’ve read 85 percent or greater).

    While recovery can take months, this is a procedure that your husband really must consider, especially now that he’s become disabled by his condition. If he finds a good doctor and gives himself time for recovery he can get better!

    Best of luck!

    Steve

  91. So now it has been 4 months. Tomorrow I am having a pet bone scan because of the pain after surgery. Still have scab on incision. Having to wear open backed shoe but even those hurt the heel. Just want to get back to normal. I am stiff and rigid when attempting steps. Balance is not real good but I do get along well with dealing with pain at same time.

  92. Hi I had revision and debribement with reduction of haglunds done on 8th October. I had similar surgery 7 years ago but back then my achillies was disconnected and reattached and was off my feet with crutches for some time………
    This time round I was in and out of surgery same day, a thick support bandage on and told could partial weight bare as tolerated, given no crutches even though I am of a large heavy sized person and told to rest it up all the times when sitting. 10 days on I have coped with the hobbling at very small intervals, but my biggest concern is reading others mail that I should not be weight baring.
    I was told stitches would be removed 2-3 weeks post surgery, yet my dressing 10 days on has not been removed to even see if the foot is heeling without infection (This is not normal to me but it was what I have been told).
    The foot is getting worse to walk on as it appears to be getting stiffer and giving me more pain when at rest, but maybe because I am on my foot more now but still resting it up a lot as directed. I am putting this down to the fact that the stitches are probably getting tighter and hopefully nothing else.
    I was told that it should be fully functionable for work in 4 weeks, and this is with the consultant knowing I work 13 hour shifts at time, on my feet all day. (I am not seeing how this is possible at present, but hoping his optimism is right).
    Enjoyed reading everyones blogs here, and look forward to some more soon.
    Thanks and Regards Moira. x

  93. I am a real person, and definitely not a spam script.

  94. Moira, I had very similar surgery and I’m at 9.5 weeks. I can not imagine standing for 13 hours. After working my part time job just in the mornings and I sit more than half the time, I immediately have to come home and prop up my feet til the pain subsides. I think it would be impossible to stand that long at 4 weeks. I also got my stitches removed at 2 weeks but they changed the dressings at 5 days! I was completely NWB the first 2 weeks. My stitches got infected at 6 weeks and I had to go on antibiotics and my body rejected the Vicryl sutures. I still have a suture abcess lump that apparently will go away on its own. I’m now in shoes but still hobbling. It’s a long road to recovery. I started PT last week and I think it is helpful. I do all the exercises and stretches they gave me on my non PT appt days. Good luck in your recovery. Hope all goes well. Oh and I had to keep my foot elevated almost all the time the first 4 weeks.

  95. This is a great blog to read. I appreciate reading all of your stories. Hopefully mine can help you out.

    I’ve had this surgery on both heels. My first one was in late December 2011. I was 35 at the time. I was in a cast for 33 days. After that, I started walking in a boot for 2.5 weeks. Around the middle of February, I was placed in a shoe. By march, I started to do stair master work and hike. By the end of April, I was back in shape. However, I did not start running until that fall. As of now, I am extremely happy with the results. This was on my right foot.

    On September 20 this year, at 37 years, I had this done on my left foot. There was a greater spike in the bone that grew than the first one. It’s now day 37, and unfortunately, I am recovering slower. I’m in a boot, but only pwb now. It hurts too much to walk. This may happen next week. I am a little scared because the process is slower. The pain is mostly a dull pain on the outside of my ankle. Hopefully, this is normal.

    I had the same doctor do both operations. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

  96. Pete, all I can really say is “Hang in there.” I know how much my spirits were buoyed by my faster and more painless progress during my second ATR rehab, compared with the first. So I can just imagine the bummer of having the second “identical” rehab go slower and hurt more. With luck, it’s just part of the random variation — not just between PATIENTS who are “all different”, but between LEGS that are, too! — and it will all come out fine when everything finishes healing.

    One thing I’m pretty sure about: Speaking from >30 years older than you are, and having gone through two similar rehabs pretty successfully not that long ago, I’m pretty sure it’s not advancing age that’s slowing you down! ;-)

  97. Hi. I had my haglunds surgery 6/12/13. Just about 4.5 months ago. Achilles tendon debridement, and reattached in 4 suture anchors. I know I have to be patient… but still in chronic pain and MRI still shows retrocalcaneal bursitis and I now have insertional tendonosis. I don’t know if I overdid it in physical therapy, which I’ve been doing for 4 months. I got a second opinion from a highly regarded orthopedic surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery and he said it’s too soon to do anything but it’s possible he may need to remove the sutures. He says be patient and it’s too soon to make any decision. Any thoughts?

  98. Hello, I had a Haglunds procedure 3 weeks ago and a section of bone removed. I had my cast off and stitches out after 12 days and was told to go and start gentle walking. A week on, I can weight bear with foor out in front, but can not get it straight, inside arch is not on the floor anymore and I can not curl my toes. I am not due to see physio for another month so wondered if this is all normal? Thank you!

  99. These posts have almost made me change my mind about having surgery in December. I have Haglunds with a couple of loose bone fragments that need to be removed. I’m still able to work out (i just limit my running quite a bit) and walk normally. If it gets too sore I just take it easy for a few days and ice and use ibuprofen. These lengthy recovery times described here are nothing like what my doctor described.

    “The incision is protected with a bandage or dressing for about one week after surgery. The stitches are generally removed in 10 to 14 days. However, if your surgeon chose to use sutures that dissolve, you won’t need to have the stitches taken out. You should be released to full activity in about six weeks.”

    Geez, this blog makes it seem like it will be at least 6 MONTHS before I can get back to normal.

    Should I avoid surgery until I have exhausted all other non-surgical methods of treatment? My doctor went right to the surgery option, which kind of concerned me considering I’m still able to do things normally 90% of the time (except for running).

  100. Just an update from Denmark. I got my Haglund operation on 20 June 2013. Quite a pain-free surgery, crutches and no weight on the leg for 3 weeks. Started work in early August .
    On September 9th, I wrote here again. It was really bad for me, I had a lot of pain was very tired and sad. I got an appointment with my surgeon, got x-rays and ultrasound scanning. Calcaneus was very nice and looked normal, no bump. Heel bone healed and perfect. Achilles was fine but still thickened.
    My pain caused bursitis and inflammation. I got a ultrasound guided cortisone injection, crutches (again) and absolute no weight on the leg for two days . 2 x 500 mg paracetamol morning and evening and no training for a week
    It is now two months ago and I feel great. I do my physiotherapy and strength/fitness training 3-5 times a week and my bad leg is almost as strong as the healthy now. I can walk 6-8 kilometers. My ankle is still a little stiff, I have scar tissue that tightens and is sore but it gets better and better.
    I do not regret my Haglund surgery ( right now) but I realize you’ll never be complete fit, must always take care of bursitis, tendiopati / tendonitis . Always remember to make ballance exercises, agility and strength. I still have problems with shoes and heel caps but it will hopefully improve by time .
    Patience , patience , patience . It is much better for me now after the surgery.

  101. Pete: Don’t worry. I was NWB for six weeks. After that, it took about ten days to wean myself off the crutches. I had the same surgery and the doctor said she cut off a “huge chunk of bone.” In the boot, I committed myself to slowly start walking, increasing distance and speed over time. Follow your PT’s advice and work on your range of motion. In a couple of months, you’ll be celebrating your hard- earned mobility!

    Doug: My doctor advised me that it would be a year or more before full recovery. At three months, I was feeling better than before the procedure, however. Many patients use crutches for six weeks and are in a boot for a month post-surgery.

    Birgitte: I’m glad you are feeling better! Working full-time wore me out for about three months after surgery. Little by little, life gets better. Working on getting stronger seems to be key to a successful recovery.

    Week 23 update: Last weekend, I ran a 5k! My doctor gave me the go ahead to start a run/walk program in mid-September since I could do a few single heel raises. Joined a gym and started doing some weights and core exercises three times a week. Also doing a fair amount of spinning and elliptical to get cardio in w/o being on my feet. Try to go hiking in the mountains about once a week. Doctor wants me to wait to try any trail running.
    Can honestly say that this surgery was the right choice. Will never take mobility for granted again since it’s truly a gift!

  102. Hi guys,
    this is a really interesting forum to read, also slightly nerve wracking seems as I haven’t had any surgery yet!
    I’ve had the lumps on the back of my feet since I was 13, and now I’m 15 I’m considering having the calcium buildup removed. Really hope it doesn’t hurt too much, I’ve read such mixed responses to the surgery- some seem to be saying their recovery was quick and the surgery was painless, while others stating that it hurt like mad and took over 12 months to heal! Does it depend on the size of the buildup? I’m not sure how big mine is, as it’s never been compared to anyone elses?

  103. Hello,
    Thanks everyone for sharing your experiences. It is good to know that I`m not alone with this problem(the Haglund deformity) and that there is a possibility to get some help even though it implies a long recovery.

    I`m 38 and the pain started around 12 years ago with a bad pair of basketball shoes that would push on my tendons. The situation degraded to the point where I have not been able to run in the last 2-3 years.

    I had an MRI and the result is that I have bursitis and partially torn tendons on both feet. I’ve consulted different doctors and did physio therapy but all the conservative treatments failed. I finally met with a surgeon last week who didn’t want to remove the bony deformity because he said it would weaken the insertion of the tendons. The secretary of a second surgeon just wrote to me today to tell me that my case doesn’t need surgical attention…

    All that to say that I’m pretty depressed by my situation…I want to consult with another doctor because I am suffering. Does anyone know a good surgeon in Quebec (Canada) that could help me?

  104. Carl, I don’t have an answer, but I’d suggest finding a good SPORTS-Medicine clinic. They often understand an athlete’s “need” to regain sporting fitness, and not just the ability to walk to the car and back. Worth a try. If there’s a university near you, their trainers and PTs might be able to refer you somewhere helpful.

  105. Amy,

    I had mine on 6/29/13, and it was the worse thing I have ever done. I go Tuesday to an infectious disease dr because a pet scan shows I have osteomylitis (infection of bone). I have been complaining all this time and nobody thinks its a big deal. I have lots of swelling and tenderness on the outside of heel and the back and lower part of heel. Hope I get some relief soon.

  106. Anyone who hates crutches should try a knee walker. Changed my way of getting around. I love it

  107. Rj Renea. Jan 11 2014
    Thanks Your post have been soooo helpful to me! . I had surgery for removal of Haglunds Syndrome jan 8 2014. Removed a lil bone and also a cyst! I’m 4 days in and struggling with elevation. But a Friend just brought me an elevation wedge, so this will help!
    I had Vicodin - which does nothing for me… So in taking Nothing and the pain is Enmm … Manageable.
    FROM YOUR POST:
    I got the knee walker- life saver
    I got the extra long cast shower cover - life saver
    I got a folding chair for the shower - sanity saver
    I got the polar ice machine pump - cooler that attached to a wrap for ankle and circulates cool ice water. Amazing IF YOU HAVE THE RIGHT PAD! The company my Dr used did not have the correct pad attachment!

    I have pain in the heel likely at surgical site but maybe that’s normal? IDK
    I’m casted and NWB - I have my flw-up visit 1/13 - hopeful to be out of cast & into boot. I’m looking forward to 4months from Now! My goal to be back on Pavement. Can’t wait to gear up and head out my front door for a run!

  108. @Martha, if you’re still here, sorry nobody answered yr Q. I think the biggest diff betw quick & slow Haglunds-op rehabs is probably whether or not the surgeon has to separate the AT from the beel bone. If not, the rehab is often quick. If so, the rehab is similar to the post-ATR year-long “marathon”, maybe even slower. That’s the simple cartoon-style answer, of course. The long answer says we’re all different and none of our body parts comes with a guarantee, and medical cures don’t either. Hope that helps. We’ve had some you gsters with ATRs and with AT-lengthening ops, but I don’t think we’ve had (m)any with Haglunds. For the other ops, I haven’t noticed any consistent diff between young and not-so-young. Nobody does any of this for (short-term) fun…

  109. Hello. I am 17 years old and am having surgery to remove the bump on the 11th of Feb (he called it a pump bump). The surgeon said that I will be on crutches for 2 months and may be put in a cast for 2 weeks post surgery if he has to move the achilles tendon more than expected. From reading these posts, do you think that this is a reasonable recovery time? I have my A level exams coming up in may/june so need to be better by then!
    Thanks,
    Hayley

  110. I had surgery in August to remove the pump bump and it still has not healed! I was told it would be all healed up after 3 months. Now I’m hoping maybe a year? Walking is still painful, 5 months post surgery. The first month was the very worst though. Good luck!

  111. Hi,
    What a great source of information on Haglund deformity problem! Thanks to everyone for sharing your experience.

    I am 45 and been running and playing tennis quite a lot. Unfortunately I had to stop my activity 1,5 year ago due to problems with AT. I visited several ortho doctors an I tried PT for 3 months. PT helped to strech AT but didn’t solve the painful problem. Than I was told it’s HD and it won’t heal without surgery, the heel spur has to be removed.

    So, I had my surgery 2 weeks ago. Fortunately there was no need to AT debridement and reattachment. I discussed with my surgeon and insisted on him to try the endoscopic way w/o long cut. They promised they start by arthtroscopy and if possible avoid the cut. Finally, they made it , there are four 1cm cuts (two each side) and just a few stitches. No cast, I walked with crutches just 4-5 days. Today I can walk already FWB.
    So, I’m very happy it went this way, I trust recovery time won’t be too long.
    Good luck everyone!

  112. Hello All,
    I had Haglunds surgery the day after Christmas. Two weeks in splint and now in a cast. So total of 6 weeks NWB. (right foot).
    Cast is to be removed next Tuesday and I will be put in a boot.
    I am hoping to be able to drive but not sure if I can take boot off just to drive. The pain from surgery was over after 1 week now its just the mental grind of sitting in a house and relying on others to drive you.

  113. Had my surgery today for Haglund deformity, micro tear at, and debridement Good news is he only had to cut half of the tendon to repair it. I also had a nerve block and can”t feel anything, which is unnerving. (Pun unintended) I think I would say no if asked again to do a nerve block. Dr told me no wb for six weeks. I go back next week for my first checkup. He said to expect full recovery from 6 mos to two years. Since I’m 57 and overweight I’m not going to hold out for the six months, but I’m hoping the one year is more in line than two years. I am anxious to get this over with. I do have a couple of questions. Did your dr prescribe antibiotics (mine didn’t, just wondering if that is usual.) Also do I need to ice my toes? I have a huge wrap and split cast on my foot, all you can see are my toes. Thanks for the help and any insight you can provide me.

  114. @Taeggy
    You should only have antibotika if you get an infection. Watch out the wound the coming weeks, it may not be red and hot and you should not have a fever.
    It is always good to cool/ice your ankle but you are in a cast now and it is not so easy. The most important is, in my opinion, to regain good movement in the ankle joint again. Tilt your toes and later in the process, flex the ankle and move the ankle joint as much as possible.
    Get a good physical therapist. Be patient. You will have good days and bad days.
    It is 7 month since I got my surgery and I (52 years old) am nearly recovered. I still can´t run but I can walk and bike, work and don´t have pain any more.

  115. Taeggy: My doctor instructed me to place ice under knee and elevate leg above heart. You will have quite a bit of swelling at the outset, icing helps quite a bit. Swelling is normal for the first three months post-op. Antibiotics were not prescribed. The nerve block is the way to go. You may have some pain coming off of it, but it really helps to have it during the first couple of days. The recovery is long, but it is worth it in the long run!

    Indybuc:
    When I was in the boot, I took it off a few times to drive to the swimming pool a couple of miles away last summer. Your leg is weak, so go slowly. Regular long distance driving did not happen until about 11-12 weeks after surgery. I can sympathize with the cabin fever. It drove me crazy! But, check with your doctor before driving!

    I am a little over 8 months post op. My leg is about 75% at this point. When you are non-weight bearing for 6-8 weeks, it takes a long time for your leg to recover. I have continued to go to the gym twice a week to lift weights. This has helped quite a bit! Ran a 10k race a couple of weeks ago and am happy to say I placed 3rd in my age group! It took about three months to feel comfortable running and pushing off with the bad foot. I take a lot more rest days and am still building mileage up. Not bad for a 48 year old lady! I’ll keep you updated. Have a half marathon scheduled for March.

  116. BRIGITTE, thank you for the info.

  117. Thank you Big Ivy for the info. It really helps. I’m four days now post surgery. The heel pain still ranges from mild to moderate, but it is tolerable. The most annoying thing is the foot and leg cramps I’m experiencing. Since my OS said nwb for 6 weeks I am trying to figure out how to stop the cramps without putting pressure on my toes. Has anyone else had this problem, and if so how did you resolve it? I see the OS on Wednesday and if all is going well he will put me in a cast for two weeks. (He also said no driving for three months because I could rupture the AT completely.) After that he said I would go into a pivotal cam cast that will be adjusted over a few months. I’m just worried that the cramps will continue while I’m in the cast and boot and won’t know how to stop them. This website has been a godsend to me; I’ve learned a lot about the trials and tribulations that others have gone through. I will use many of the suggestions once I am able to start walking. I look forward to sharing my experiences as time goes on.

  118. I’m going to be undergoing an upcoming Haglund’s surgery sometime in the next several months.

    Does anyone know of way to check an individual Orthopedic Surgeon’s past history specifically related to Haglund’s?

    I know there a lot of very talented Orthopedic Surgeon’s out there, but Haglund’s is a very specialized case. I want to find a surgeon that has a strong case history of delivering successful results with Haglund’s.

  119. Have really enjoyed reading everyone’s posts - to be honest it was rare to find anyone who understood what had happened.

    My right foot popped walking across a road and as I wasn’t aware what happened kept exercising until the pain was unbearable the lump on my heal was huge and very painful - I also managed to shatter the bone and the Achilles tendon required attachment - the up shot after surgery seasons 1 - 4 of breaking bad and three months of recovery - the hardest part is the first month then it’s about not over doing it - surgeons code for sit with leg up and rest - the left heel - well I didn’t do anything other than get out of bed when it went - so I had surgery two weeks after coming of crutches and walking free of the moon boot for two weeks - the left leg wasn’t as intense - I didn’t require a second cast and went straight to moon boot - although the swelling around the ankle took forever to subside.

    The time frame from first feeling the pain and having two lots of surgery was two years - I am now one year clear of the second lot of surgery - only since Jan this year have i felt confident to push off my feet - I am struggling to get into running and it’s just not happening - I go for walks pain free and play basketball with no issues - I think the issue maybe the shape of my heel after surgery has changed and I am trying different running shoes - the sports stores have been great helping out with this - I experience cramps in my shin area I have never had before - I have decided to use exercise bike and lose some weight before trying to run again as I believe this maybe an issue - I had an excellent result and outcome - my message to everyone is take it slow and perhaps accept there will now be limits - one thing that I haven’t seen in posts is the comments made by the surgeon who did my operation - he said there is a high probability of the Haglund’s returning in eight to ten years - basically the message was you can walk, swim, ride bike and run - moderation is the key.

    Good luck to everyone - and enjoy breaking bad in your recovery time

  120. I had my Haglund surgery and tendon reattachment on 10/24/13. I was nwb for 6 weeks then on crutches for another 4 with a slow transition to a walking boot during that time. Started fwb at around 10 weeks. I started PT 3 days after surgery to facilitate the healing of the wound with increasing activity leading up to 16 weeks. I was having increased pain in my heal and calf area similar to pre surgery condition. PT was discontinued and a EMG was done to determine possible nerve damage. Now I’ve, at 20 weeks, just had 2 injections in my L5 S1 area to alleviate the pain in my calf. At this point the pain in my right heal is worse than it ever was before my surgery. But I do have good days. I took my first walk of a mile 2 days ago and I have been able to ride my stationary bike for 25 miles at a time. After reading these entries from everyone else who has had this procedure I can come away with two conclusions-everyone heals at a different rate and we all must be patient. I’m a soccer ref and was hoping to be back on the field this season. No go. Now my new goal is the upcoming fall season. Great blog. Hang in there everyone!

  121. I had Haglund surgery December 9. Healing is a s l o w process. With the haglund deformity, I was still able to cycle at least 100 mi a week, do plyo and spin classes with pain mostly in the evening. After surgery, now I really know what pain is and its most of the time - not just in the evenings. I know I’m getting better - at least people say I’m walking better, but every step hurts and its so frustrating waiting to heal. I’m almost 4 months into recovery, but still unable to walk without pain. Working on evenly distributing weight when I do heel lifts in PT. Working on my “patience” as well. Uggh.

  122. I had Haglund surgery, 19 October 2013 (local Podiatrist), left heel, and all went well for next 12 weeks; 6 weeks nwb & 6 weeks walking boot. No pain. Recently, the swelling/ pain has re occured. Temporary relief with RICE. Pain is worse than before surgery. Haglunds deformity, Rt heel (awiting surgery), same issues, but I can live w/pain after stretching. Changed physicians (Foot Orthopedic Surgeon) and was told I need ankle/heel re construction; i.e., tendon transplant. Same recovery time frame. Requested a cortizone shot and approved, the pain disappeared instantly! First time pain free in five years! Anyone with similar conditions/issues?

  123. I am 26 and 3 weeks post op for removal of haglund’s deformity (plus a little bit of heel bone) with partial detachment of AT. My doc has been amazing. The surgery went very well and I am healing quickly. I was put into a half-cast for the first 2 weeks, NWB Boot for 1 week and scheduled to be WB Boot for another 3 weeks. Today is the day I get to start putting weight on it, ditch the crutches and start walking. Only that isn’t as easy and happy as it sounds. I am struggling so much. It is super painful to put any weight on it. My balance is way off and I can’t move without falling over. Sadly I am still using my crutches while trying to teach myself how to walk in this thing. Anyone else have a hard time transitioning from NWB to WB?

  124. Vam: Try using a NWB “knee-on” scooter for a few weeks.
    Works great on hard, level surfaces. I ditched the crutches and used the scooter almost exclusively for six weeks.

  125. doglased: Thank you for the advice. It turned out my boot was not inflating properly. It’s fixed now and today was the first day I was able to walk (hobble would be more appropriate) around without crutches :)

  126. Hi everyone. It has been so helpful to read your comments. I am a very athletic 51 y/o ultrarunner with bilateral hagland deformities and insertional Achilles tendinosis. I had surgery on the right on November 8, 2013 (hagland excision with Achilles debridementt and reattachment), and after 6 months I am able to run/walk 6 miles pain-free, and it is getting better in a weekly basis. Now I am planning to fix the left next month. Hoping to be back in the trails by the end of the year. It is a long process, but worth it if you want to continue with an active lifestyle.

  127. Steve01, if you’re still following this blog, may I inquire as to the OS that you used in the Philly area. I have been advised that I need similar surgery and am looking for a second opinion.

  128. Hi. I’m interested in hearing from people further out in the recovery process. I’m a 30 year old female who had haglund’s surgery with debridement & repair 9 weeks ago. My surgeon said the debridement was “incredibly minimal” and originally told me I could be running 3 months out. But at 9 weeks I can’t even walk in my shoes I have shooting pains on the outside of my foot and don’t have any push off and can’t do a heel lift. For people like this, when did you get back to running? Or–more importantly–just walking pain free, or at least manageably?

  129. I had surgery for Haglund’s on April 17th. They found a hard mass during surgery and had to remove it. Thankfully, it came back benign. They also filed down the bone, repaired the tendon and anchored the tendon back down. I was in a post op cast for 1 week, a hard cast for 3 weeks and have been in a boot for 2 weeks now. I go back in 2 weeks to supposedly get the boot off and not sure from there. My boot is built up in the heel and have been allowed to put weight down on my toes since I got my boot on 2 weeks ago. My toes stay a little purplish and cold. Has anyone else had these symptoms?

  130. Hi there,
    I just recently found out I have haglunds deformity in both of my feet. We are starting with cortizone shots but I tend to look ahead and was wondering if the deformity ever came back for someone? My doctor doesn’t want to use more than three shots per site for my whole life! I am overweight but not morbidly so. I know that losing weight can prevent further growth but I do not know how to do so when I can’t run or be on my feet excessivly. Any suggestions?

  131. I am also over weight and just had the Achilles’ tendon future op , forecast was 8 weeks sitting on my bum doing nothing so decided to lose weight, have tried many diets in the past and never worked. This time I decided to cut out meals and snack, it has worked really well. When my family sit down to eat I don’t join them but later eat a small salad with some protein. porridge or toast for breakfast, maybe a small snack of cheese and fruit at lunchtime, fruit when hungry in between and an occasional treat like chocolate, I have found it really works, I am not hungry don’t have to follow a rigid diet some genius wrote, just listen to my own body. If. I am hungry before bed I have a glass of milk and a biscuit. I think the trick is just cutting out big meals which of course include, pasta, potatoes, rice or bread, red meat and sauces. It has worked for me lost around 10 lbs in 2 weeks. Hope this idea helps.

  132. Hello everyone,
    I had higlund’s resection and an achilles debridement on June 19th I was in a cast for 2 weeks now I am back in a boot with crutches. I have fallen on my foot twice since surgery, my Dr says I have not ruptured my Achilles with the falls. However it’s almost been a week since I have been put in a boot with crutches I still am not able to put any weight or walk on my foot. I was not prepared for this recovery. Is the about right? I know everyone heals differently, but I have pain at all I only took pain meds for 1 day. Just can’t put any weight on it. I will start pt next month. I just want to walk and wear a pair of shoes again.

  133. Roberta,
    I had the same surgery as you did (also on June 19th). I was in a removable splint for three weeks… Until the stitches were removed. No weight-bearing (used crutches and a roll-about) for the first 4 weeks. Started using the boot last week, with three pads (heel lifts) to cushion the heel. My foot doctor/ surgeon stressed that I GRADUALLY put weight on my foot over the next 4 weeks. It’s tempting to rush it, because I’m so anxious to get back to running and biking! 10% weight-bearing this week, 25% starting week 5, etc. My goal is to be in normal shoes and walking normally? By mid-August. PT starts next week. If you have access to a pool, it might help to start walking (baby steps) in chest-deep water….gradually going to waist-deep as tolerable. Hang in there! The hardest part is WAITING to get back to normal!

  134. Hi!
    I popped my Achilles while playing tennis the beginning of June. I had the surgery on June 20th and I am still in a cast and on crutches. Apparently my doctor is a bit old school. I finally get to upgrade to a boot this coming Monday. How long was it before you were able to walk without crutches? The cast really doesn’t bother me but after almost 2 months on the crutches I am starting to really hate them.

  135. jblain, as an avid tennis player myself, who also suffered my ATR while playing tennis, I can appreciate your situation. There is quite a bit of variability in rehab protocols, so you really should ask your OS for his/her protocol for you. I can tell you that post-op I was in a splint for 2 weeks, a cast for 2 weeks, and then got my “boot”–at which time I began PWB status and worked to FWB (no crutches) over the next 2 week period. -David

  136. That sounds about right. Just started partial weight bearing a few days ago, with the help of crutches. Seriously considering ditching the crutches and using one of those 3- prong canes.

  137. Becky H,
    Wow sounds like you are doing good! That let’s me know there is light at the end of the tunnel. I am in a boot but nwb I see my Dr next week. So I am hoping he will allow me to start pwb. But I don’t honestly feel I can at this point. I Start pt soon. I hope my recovery is as speedy as yours! Keep up your hard work. Do you have any pain putting weight on it?

  138. I’m in my early 50s and have been having Achilles and heel pain for about 3 years in my right heel. I have “complicated” feet due to an accident in 2007 and toe surgery resulting from the accident in 2012 and I’ve over-pronated all my life, apparently.
    I had shock wave therapy on my right heel before the surgery in 2012 as I was so worried about being able to mobilise after the surgery. The shock wave therapy gave me about 6 months relief from the heel pain in 2012.
    Since the pain returned in early 3-12 I’ve had extensive physio and NSAI treatment. I eventually went for investigation and diagnosis last year with a foot and ankle surgeon. This established I have a Haglund’s deformity and large Achilles bone spur. The only options I have for treatment are surgical - to remove the Haglund’s and the bone spur and I’m due to have the surgery sometime within the next few weeks.
    This will involve detaching my Achilles tendon. I’m feeling very anxious about this and have delayed the surgery as a result. However, my consultant is a foot and ankle specialist and my physio says he gets good results.
    I’m hoping to make contact with others in the UK who are having or have had this surgery and get some pointers as to what to expect and what I can do to get a good outcome for myself.
    I’m overweight, just beginning the menopause and have very well managed T2. I’m usually in good health and generally very active (pain and stiffness permitting). Anyone else here had surgery under similar circumstances? Is anyone else in the UK?
    Thanks for this blog, it is really helpful to read through other people’s experiences and find out about how you recovered

  139. Roberta,
    How is week 5 going for you? I’m at about 25% weight- bearing ( right on schedule…yea!). Was able to hobble around with only one crutch for the first time, yesterday. Felt ok at the time, but had heel pain during the night. Back to icing 5 or 6 times a day. Does your doctor have you doing contrast soaks at night? Those have helped with the heel pain and healing of the incision site. Post-Op appointment and x-ray tomorrow. Hoping the doc will clear me to DRIVE again…. hate depending on family to take me places!

  140. Becky,
    I am doing great! I am walking without my boot and without crutches around the house. But crutches anytime I leave home. I went back to work. Started pt yesterday. I get very swollen by the evening. My Dr said I am doing better than I think I am. I still am taking it slow. No I never heard of contrast soaks, what is that? Once your driving you will feel so much better. I did. I am anxious to go to the store all alone. I haven’t used my scooter I had to stop since my Dr appt on Monday. I am slowly getting rid of my boot it was causing me hip pain. I feel better in my Shoes. How did your appt go? I hope your pain is decreasing. Are you going to start pt? Yay we are making progress!

  141. Had my surgery done in April 2014. Procedures performed - Resection Haglund bony prominence; Achilles debridement; Muscle and Achilles tendon repairs and Bursectomy. Right heel.

    Had complications with disolvable stitches, allergic reaction which formed an abscess. Went in to theater again to have it cleaned - Achilles tendon synovectomy; Stitching of soft-tissue injuries - Deep laceration;
    Major debridement of wound, sloughectomy or second.

    Four months down the line and I am still experiencing extreme pain after a day on my feet and even wearing open heel Crocs.

    Pain is getting better when I am trying to walk normally, flexing the foot rather than trying to keep it straight whilst walking. Pain experienced is in various area of the heel and sometimes feel like stabs and sometimes like burning and or electrical shocks.

    Being to the gym and did cycling and walking on the beach in loose sand (killing me) but will get better. The specialist said that it will take up yo 12 months to be pain free and have normal function back.

    I am using heat packs and heat rub at night before going to bed. I am also making an effort to stretch as much as possible without recurring injury.

    For all of you that had the surgery, keep strong and stretch, it will get better.

  142. Roberta,
    The fashionable boot comes off (for good), tomorrow. This past week has been a transition week, walking around in normal shoes for awhile each day. Taking short walks around the neighborhood, increasing the distance a little everyday…. I’m up to a 1/2 mile SLOW pace, now. Started PT last week. Range of motion is great, and rarely have any pain (mostly just soreness if I’m on it too long). Back to driving and swimming…yea! The nightly contrast soaks really help with the soreness. One container of room- temperature water, and one container of cold water (at least calf-deep….I use coolers). Soak your foot for 10 - 12 minutes, switching back and forth between the two containers every minute. I was doing this 3 or 4 times a night, when my foot was sore or swollen. Much more comfort than from the ice-packs!.
    Glad to hear you are back at work…. Progress!! I retired a couple of months before the surgery, but have started looking for part-time work (sick of laying around the house….. I feel like a slug!). We’ve made it 8 weeks, good luck on your continuing recovery

  143. Hi — I just wanted to (1) share a warning and (2) ask for feedback. Warning: I had moderate-severe achilles tendinitis for six months and saw a surgeon who diagnosed me with Haglund’s deformity and told me I would be running in three months after surgery. It’s not almost five months and i’m still in a walking boot. I can’t walk pain free, I have shooting pains all alongside the ankle, and it feels like I have a rope pulling on the inside of my foot. I’ve seen the surgeon again multiple times as well as two others who tell me “nothing’s wrong,” but it sure feels like it. Has anyone else had this? Do you get better? I don’t know what to do. 18 months ago I was biking 50 miles in mountains, swimming competitively, and running. Now I can’t walk and I’m not getting any closer.

  144. Hi
    It is now over a year since I got my Haglund surgery (June 2013). The first six months, I believed in the project but now I have realized that my right foot will never be good again, I will always have pain. My doctors also says, that I have tried everything now ( they are very tired of me), Maybe it will be better… maybe not :-(
    I has been running for many years, trekked all the world, climbed mountains, done a lot of funny sports but it’s over now. I can bike but I am not able to do a walk. I am 52 years old.
    Now I only work 80% and may soon sell my apartment on the 2nd floor because I have great difficulty with stairs.
    I am training strength 2 times a week, go to a physiotherapist every 14 night, and bikes 60-70 kilometers every weekend, but nothing realy helps. Only cortisone “helps” 4-5 weeks. But we all know it is no-no.
    I have read the whole thread again and see, we all have the same problems. It is somewhat incomprehensible to me, all our doctors says it takes 3-6 months and that we will be running again.
    Maybe it’s just us with all the problems who are writing here? Where are all the good storries?
    My skin and heel area is so sore and painful and I can only wear Crocs. It is very difficult to keep the optimisme.
    Good luck to all haglund/achlles people.

  145. 7 months post Haglunds / Achilles surgery! If I could go back in time, I would NOT have the surgery. 7 months and I can only run every 3 days, to give the pain and swelling a chance to settle down. The 1st step out of bed every morning is a challenge. I have returned to yoga class and that helps stretch the Achilles.. My healing journey is long….. I had PT for 5 months and finally the only thing that help provided some relief and get me past the pain was a PT procedure called “Dry Needling” it IS what got me back walking/running, even though it’s still very painful, it is tolerable. Basically I’m still icing, baby-ing, and resting my Achilles, which is the same thing I was doing prior to the surgery. ONLY HAVE THE SURGERY AS A LAST DESPERATE OPTION. My Achilles scar is horrible and the scar tissue is pretty bad too. My inside ankle still swells a lot when I’m up on my feet most of the day.

  146. I fully agree with Birggite and Renea. This is one surgery I will not have performed again. I have the same problem with my left foot, luckily not as bad as the right foot.

    We might be too impatient and need give it more time. If there is no other option available and one can not walk it will be a problem . That was the reason for going for the first op. Age 59, did a lot of sport,rugby,cycling , hiking etc.

    Now had to slow down to a snails pace. Only doing the occasional short walk and gym session.

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  148. Thank you for this blog! I was diagnosed with Haglund’s finally in June ‘14. After $$$ in PT, changing shoes, following all Dr. orders, and three different specialist’s, I am in agreement with myself to continue to live with the pain. As I am 60+ and still very active with kids in school, I do not want to give up the mobility that I have. I use a Tens unit, medicated lotion, and a pain reliever, over the counter. The most relief that I did experience was with acupuncture. He also told me to reduce “carbs” which really does help.

  149. I use Essential Oils from Whole Foods or Campbell’s. The lavender roll on helps with the swelling and the Peppermint Roll On helps with the pain - ALOT. I’m 8 months post surgery (side incision, no Achilles removal or debreement) and running 4-6 miles at a walk-jog 50/50 ratio. I also wear compression socks during the run (no calf sleeves bc they keep too much fluid in the heel/foot).

  150. Hi
    Has anybody in here tried PRP treatment against the inflammation?
    I am visiting a klinik next week and they will see if it is an option to give the achilles tendon a boost of my own growfactor.
    I have nothing to loose (except money).

  151. Birgitte, I had 3 PRP injections early in my non-op treatment for an ATR. i have no idea if they helped or not, and the evidence I’ve seen is either weak or negative. it did cost a bunch, though not too much if it made a significant difference. There are a few blog pages here that deal with PRP injections repeatedly. My recollection is that more people found them very painful (I didn’t) than clearly helpful, but you can read them for yourself.

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